http://www.bolivarcom.com/view/full_story/13968088/article-No-Bolivar-County-burn-ban-yet?instance=most_recommended

Not only here in Bolivar County but across the Mississippi Delta over the past  several weeks, dark clouds of rising smoke have cluttered the horizon in every  direction.

The voices of many a concerned citizen ring loudly in boards  of aldermen and supervisors meetings in the towns that litter the landscape of  the Mississippi Delta, but they are, more often than not, ringing on deaf  ears.

“I am concerned. I am concerned for the private properties that  surround many of the burning fields, but I am more concerned with the  potentially devastating effect that the smoke will likely have on the  environment. Only living in the Delta for a few years, I cannot believe that the  EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) has not stepped in and put an end to these  senseless burnings,” said one citizen at one of these small town Delta  meetings.

“There is some legitimate concern there,” said a representative  from the Mississippi Forestry Commission. “But the simple truth is that by law  we cannot step in until we are asked by the individual county board of  supervisors.

Last year, Gov. Haley Barbour, passed a law banning any  burns within the boarders of the state of Mississippi.

This was because  of the drought affecting much of the state and the fear that these ‘wildfires’ would ultimately burn out of control causing severe damages to adjoining  properties.

However, there are some that benefit from these  burnings.

Farmers have a tough job. Every year they are fighting the odds — Mother Nature, new machinery, higher fuel prices and lower commodity prices  just to name a few.

In their minds, burning fields is a simple, cost  effective way of removing crop stubble from the fields that have been harvested  in preparation of planting the new crops.

Area farmers have been burning  fields for years. Their fathers did it and now they are simply following in the  process.

However, this year has been undeniably worse than others of  recent memory due to the fact that the county has had more wheat planted this  year than in years passed.

The high winds that often torment this area of  the U.S. during the spring and early summer months makes the process of burning  that much more of a sensitive and dangerous topic.

Again, burn bans are  requested by the county board of supervisors before being approved by the  Mississippi Forestry Commission.

Several Mississippi Counties currently  find themselves under burn bans, such as Amite, Copiah, George, Hancock,  Harrison, Jackson, Jones, Lincoln, Marion, Pike and Stone.

Read more:  The Bolivar Commercial – No Bolivar County burn ban yet

 

 

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