Category: America’ Most Wanted


http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/local/neighborhoods-city/most-wanted-covers-search-for-million-dollar-robbery-suspect-467301/

http://news.yahoo.com/americas-most-wanted-return-cable-dec-2-194857648.html

NEW YORK (AP) — Bad guys, look out! John Walsh will be back on the air next month with weekly editions of “America’s Most Wanted.”

The Lifetime cable TV network announced Tuesday the crime-fighting series will return for its 25th season on Dec. 2. Lifetime has ordered 20 weekly hour-long episodes.

Walsh remains the host of the criminal roundup, which since 1988 has helped bring almost 1,200 fugitives to justice.

Until June, “America’s Most Wanted” had been a fixture on the Fox network. But last spring Fox announced it was axing the series because of high production costs.

Walsh calls his show “the court of last resort” in its mission to put criminals behind bars.

Walsh’s 6-year-old son, Adam, was kidnapped and killed in 1981.

 

http://www.nypost.com/p/entertainment/tv/inventing_walsh_roxobSmgcUnlhLZnAHsxFK?utm_campaign=Post10&utm_source=Post10Alpha

While John Walsh closes one chapter of “America’s Most  Wanted” and opens another, he can reflect on his self-described “incredible journey” from luxury-hotel builder to TV’s top crimebuster in a  genre that didn’t exist before he came along.

The first of Walsh’s four “AMW” specials airs tomorrow night on Fox — its  home since 1988. Meanwhile, the series soon moves to a new home on Lifetime.

It’s been 30 years since Walsh’s 6-year-old son, Adam, was kidnapped and  brutally murdered — a horrific, life-altering experience that changed the  course of Walsh’s life.

“I was building a $26 million hotel on Paradise Island [when he heard the  news] — that was my love, the hotel business,” says Walsh. “I was successful at  a young age and was part-owner of my own company who went from that business  into the horrible reality of being the parent of a murdered child . . . I didn’t  give a damn anymore about building hotels.”

Walsh’s single-minded pursuit of justice on Adam’s behalf led Fox to hire  Walsh, in 1988, to host its new show, “America’s Most Wanted.”

“I kept saying no. I didn’t know d–k about TV,” Walsh says. “I said, ‘What  is reality TV and what the hell is Fox?’ ’’ But Walsh’s wife, Reve, encouraged  the move and, before long, he was shooting a pilot.

“My first executive producer, Michael Linder, said, ‘Look, you’re made for  TV. You’ve got the hair, the voice, you’re a handsome guy and I’m gonna teach  you how to do this.’

“I would get nervous the day before a shoot . . . it was all by the  seat-of-your pants,” he says. “The learning curve was steep. It was torture. I  didn’t even know which camera was on and I didn’t know where to look.”

“AMW” nabbed a fugitive from the FBI’s most-wanted list in its very first  show and hasn’t looked back.

When, in 1996, Fox canceled the show, the outcry from the law-enforcement  community forced it to reverse its decision.

Walsh says he hasn’t always had a harmonious relationship with law  enforcement.

“When we first started, the  FBI endorsed ‘AMW’ but the small police departments were skeptical about the  media,” Walsh says. “I think the cops knew that, right off the bat, I would be  very critical of them. American cops look at me as an extension of them . . .  but I’m not a cop, and I still keep that distance,” he says.

“I could write books about my battles with law enforcement — they’re my best  buddies, then they shut me out of a case.

“I’ve got a track record, but it’s been a little adversarial over the  years.”

Read more: http://www.nypost.com/p/entertainment/tv/inventing_walsh_roxobSmgcUnlhLZnAHsxFK#ixzz1c6kqnhNc

 

FILE - In this May 17, 2010 file photo, TV personality John Walsh attends the FOX Upfront presentation in New York. "America's Most Wanted" is resuming its decades-long run on a new network, Lifetime, host John Walsh and the network said Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2011. (AP Photo/Peter Kramer, file)http://news.yahoo.com/john-walsh-bring-most-wanted-lifetime-221109708.html

NEW YORK (AP) — “America’s Most Wanted” is resuming its decades-long run on a new network, Lifetime, host John Walsh and the network said Tuesday.

The deal will restore to the air Walsh’s weekly criminal roundup, which since 1988 has helped bring almost 1,200 fugitives to justice.

The series will return for its 25th season later this year.

In May, Fox announced it was axing the series, citing high production costs, though the network said it would air four quarterly specials in the coming season. The first of those specials will air in October.

But Fox’s final weekly “AMW” was telecast in June.

In a happy coincidence, on Saturday, Walsh will get a special Emmy Award in tribute to his show.

___

 

http://losangeles.ibtimes.com/articles/168679/20110623/america-s-most-wanted-fugitive-james-whitey-bulger-caught.htm

June 23, 2011 4:14 PM EDT

Former Bostom crime boss who was one of America’s Most Wanted, is finally caught in California’s Santa Monica area after being on the run since late 1994.

Bulger is a former leader of Winter Hill Gang, an Irish-American criminal group, and is wanted for 19 murders, conspiracy, extortion, drug dealing, and money laundering.

Bulger had served as an informant for the Federal Bureau of Investigation in a controversial arrangement that allowed him to continue his criminal activities.

The 81-year-old fugitive and his longtime girlfriend Catherine Greig, 60, were apprehended outside of their apartment without incident Wednesday. Agents also found a stash of cash and firearms during a search of their apartment.

The case had long stumped authorities, but a fresh 30-second TV campaign that launched only on Tuesday to find Greig quickly paid off with a helpful tip by an unidentified person.

Bulger, who was found in poor health, will face life in prison if convicted, according to U.S. Attorney Carmen Ortiz at a news conference.

“We’ve gone a long way to bringing justice to the families of the victims,” Ortiz said.

A scandal involving a top FBI agent who acted as Bulger’s informant and was later sentenced, had thwarted his capture and embarrassed the FBI. The crime boss’ story even inspiredt the film “The Departed”.

Bulger has been featured on America’s Most Wanted over a dozen times, with a 2 million dollar reward for information leader to Bulger’s arrest, along with $100,000 for information on Greig.

 

http://blogs.wsj.com/economics/2011/06/21/john-walsh-a-regulator-critical-of-over-regulation/

By Victoria McGrane

There aren’t many regulators saying things that big banks want to hear these days, but they’ll like this: Acting Comptroller of the Currency John Walsh on Tuesday warned international regulators that they may be trying to rein in the financial industry too much.

“We are in danger of trying to squeeze too much risk and complexity out of banking as we institute reforms to addresses problems and abuses stemming from the last crisis,” he said at the Centre for the Study of Financial Innovation in London, according to his prepared remarks.

That’s a far different tune from what’s coming from other players in the financial overhaul, who’ve emphasized that banks should get back to the boring business of banking and complexity should be limited.

In contrast, Mr. Walsh argued in his speech that imposing high capital requirements, tight liquidity rules and restrictions on what activities banks can engage in threaten to hurt economic growth.

He urged particular caution on the issue of imposing additional capital requirements on the largest banks — or a “surcharge” on systemically important firms, and his comments come as international regulators are pushing in coming weeks to reach agreement on just how much extra capital the biggest banks must hold.

Mr. Walsh argued that capital levels are already “extraordinarily high by historical standards” and said, at most, a “modest” surcharge on the largest firms may be appropriate. If capital standards are “carried too far, the economy suffers” because higher costs curtail the amount of banking activity necessary for growth, he said.

Mr. Walsh said he is even more skeptical about reform efforts focused on limiting banks’ activities and organization form. The latter is in sharp contrast with Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. Chairman Sheila Bair, who has repeatedly emphasized that regulators must insist that the nation’s biggest financial institutions make structural changes — making their activities “rationalized and simplified” — so regulators can handle their failure without sparking another crisis.

He also pushed back against regulators who would like to define what’s prohibited by the so-called Volcker rule broadly since that could prevent banks from engaging in legitimate banking activities. Championed by former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker, the rule aims to get commercial banks back to the business of banking and out of certain risky or speculative activities.

“If we draw the circle too narrowly around what we call ‘banking,’ we will unnecessarily restrict legitimate banking activity and raise its cost,” said Mr. Walsh.

 

America’s Most Wanted

http://beta.news.yahoo.com/brazil-american-wanted-sex-crimes-captured-201138141.html

SAO PAULO (AP) — An American on the U.S. Marshals’ list of most-wanted sex offenders has been captured in Brazil.

A spokesman for Brazil’s federal police says officers in Rio de Janeiro on Tuesday captured Kenneth Andrew Craig. The U.S. Embassy has confirmed the arrest.

The U.S. Marshals’ website says Craig is wanted for sexual assault against two boys in Florida in 1998 and unlawful flight to avoid prosecution.

The Brazilian police spokesman offered no other details on Craig’s arrest and spoke on condition of anonymity per department rules.

Craig was featured twice recently on the “America’s Most Wanted” TV show.

 

America’s Most Wanted

Tonight I tuned in to see America’s Most Wanted for the last time. It’s really sad to see a telvision show that has last so long on tv be canceled like this. But,however, right before the credits started to roll John Walsh said that America’s Most Wanted may return in the fall. I sure hope so, because America’s Most Wanted is only show that actually makes a difference. So I want to know what ya’ll think. Should they keep America’s Most Wanted or cancel it? Post your comments and tell me what you think.

FILE- This March 12, 2009 file photo shows John Walsh, host of the television show "America's Most Wanted," in New York. This week marks the final weekly airing of "America's Most Wanted" on the Fox network after 23 years and 1153 fugitives nabbed. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, FILE)http://beta.news.yahoo.com/amw-ending-run-fox-john-walsh-isnt-done-200526524.html

NEW YORK (AP) — This week marks the final weekly airing of “America’s Most Wanted” on the Fox network after 23 years and 1,153 fugitives nabbed.

“I don’t think it’s hit me yet,” said John Walsh, the host and driving force of what he turned into a nationwide crime watch. “Saturday when I see the last show — that’s gonna be painful.”

But that broadcast, which airs at 9 p.m. EDT, is billed as the season finale — not the series conclusion — on the “AMW” website.

Not surprisingly, this is the same attitude voiced by Walsh.

“I’m fighting hard to keep this franchise going,” he said. “It’s a television show that gets ratings AND saves lives, and we’ll find somewhere to keep going. We’re not done.”

Speaking by phone Thursday morning, he had just arrived back in Washington from Brazil. There, he was hunting for a pedophile who has been hiding out in Rio de Janeiro for 14 years.

“He’s a fake minister who molested tons of boys in Florida,” Walsh said. “I was working with Brazilian police, and I think I’ll get this guy.”

The case will be spotlighted on Saturday’s show, and, as he spoke, Walsh was headed to “AMW” headquarters to supervise editing the segment.

He said he will make some parting remarks at the end of the show, with the promise, “We’re going to land somewhere else.”

And after that?

“I’m so used to doing what I’ve done every day for 23 years that I’m still trying to sort it all out,” he said. “But I have many, many offers, a long list I’ve got to wade through and see where we go from here.”

One possibility, he said, is News Corp. sibling Fox News Channel, which that network confirms.

Fox News chairman Roger Ailes “has had preliminary discussions with John Walsh and he’s a fan of ‘America’s Most Wanted,'” said Fox News spokeswoman Irena Briganti, “but nothing has been decided.”

Walsh said he hopes to have a deal in place, probably with a cable network, within two weeks.

This, of course, is the man who mounted a crime-busting crusade in the aftermath of the abduction and murder of his 6-year-old son Adam in 1981. He became an outspoken advocate for tougher laws against sex offenders, more cooperation among law enforcement agencies, and citizen involvement in flushing out fugitives.

His TV show premiered in April 1988 on the fledgling Fox network and, little more than a year later, it was the first-ever Fox program to rank first in viewership in its time slot. It’s been a fixture on the network ever since, and during the 2010-11 season, was seen by an audience averaging 5 million viewers.

So last month Walsh, 65, was “in shock,” he said, on getting the news that “AMW” had been canceled. The show is too expensive to produce, Fox entertainment head Kevin Reilly explained. The network is planning to air weekly repeats of its prime-time entertainment series in the Saturday slot “AMW” has held for so long.

“AMW” isn’t completely disappearing from the network. There will be four, two-hour specials aired next season, Reilly said in making the announcement in May.

So far, Walsh said, there have been no discussions with Fox about how and when the specials will be produced. And they won’t preserve the current “AMW” operation, with its 70-plus staff.

“I’ve got hotline operators, website guys, reporters, writers, graphic artists, engineers — we’re a full-blown news operation,” Walsh said. “One of the most painful things I’ve got to do is cut everybody loose. Now my first priority is to be sure Fox treats these people fairly, which I think they will.”

Besides offering “AMW” employees what Walsh calls a “really fair” severance package, Fox has agreed to maintain the telephone hotline and website, which are both essential for receiving tips on fugitives from the public.

Then Walsh hopes “AMW” will soon be settled in a new TV home.

“It’s very simple,” he said. “I want to catch bad guys and find missing children — and we’re not done.”

___

Online:

http://www.amw.com

___

EDITOR’S NOTE — Frazier Moore is a national television columnist for The Associated Press. He can be reached at fmoore(at)ap.org and at http://www.twitter.com/tvfrazier

 

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  • jason
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    jason2 hours agoReport Abuse

    This man is a true hero.  We will never know the countless lives that may have been saved over the last 23 years because of his brave actions.  He took an unimaginable tragedy and turned it into something so wonderful! I wish you and your family the best in all you do John!

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  • Diana
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    Diana2 hours agoReport Abuse

    think you need to talk to Oprah!!! She has a new network remember! AMW would make a great add on to the OWN network. Who’s with me on this??

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  • jrab
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    jrab2 hours agoReport Abuse

    I hope he’s not done, he has done wonderful things coming out of a great tragedy. Goodluck to you Mr. Walsh.

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  • SCOTT N
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    SCOTT Nabout an hour agoReport Abuse

    Fox ought to do away with their crude, stupid cartoons in order to make room for “America’s Most Wanted”, a show which actually HAS a purpose for being on the air! This show is a public service in and of itself, and should be a priority! Makes me wonder where Fox’s priorities lie!

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  • Linda
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    Linda2 hours agoReport Abuse

    America’s Most Wanted has been cancelled from Fox and they are wondering what now.  Why can’t AMW have their own show appearing opposite Fox news? I’d watch it over Fox news any day. They are making a mistake.

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  • DanS
    5users liked this commentThumbs UpThumbs Down1users disliked this comment

    DanS2 hours agoReport Abuse

    Shame on FOX!! To end a show that has proven that it was the leading reason dangerous ppl were caught and FOX cancels the show?? Someone at FOX must have bumped their head, hard!! Bring the show back!!! If not, hopefully John Walsh and AMW can find another station to carry/air the show. Good Luck… More

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  • Red Roses
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    Red Rosesabout an hour agoReport Abuse

    They have to find a new station for this show.  Killers and perverts have to be found.  Walsh is a hero!!!!

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  • Tamara
    4users liked this commentThumbs UpThumbs Down0users disliked this comment

    Tamaraabout an hour agoReport Abuse

    This is unbelievable. This show should never end, never! Mr Walsh is a true hero at best for getting the “bad guys and girls” and has done a wonderful job utilizing our true great detectives all over the world. I am astonished that this show would ever die because unfortunately as long as there are… More

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  • Otter
    7users liked this commentThumbs UpThumbs Down1users disliked this comment

    Otter2 hours agoReport Abuse

    I remember being a child when his son was kidnapped. He really has changed TV and is a hero to me. Good luck Mr Walsh!

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  • Ron
    3users liked this commentThumbs UpThumbs Down0users disliked this comment

    Ronabout an hour agoReport Abuse

    Well, that’s a real shame. I’ve been watching AMW off and on since I was like 12 years old. I agree that Oprah’s network would welcome him into the fold, but I’m not sure if would be quite as effective on a cable network. In any case, I hope the show is able to find a new home. Heck, this is a show… More

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  • Gail
    3users liked this commentThumbs UpThumbs Down0users disliked this comment

    Gail2 hours agoReport Abuse

    what a shame that Fox has done this to AMW. think I will start a boycott of any Fox shows, I know I won’t be watching that station anymore.

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  • Mark
    5users liked this commentThumbs UpThumbs Down1users disliked this comment

    Markabout an hour agoReport Abuse

    Why would you even consider cancelling a show that has actually accomplished something other then destroying brain cells.

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  • Janice R
    5users liked this commentThumbs UpThumbs Down1users disliked this comment

    Janice R2 hours agoReport Abuse

    I can not believe fox has decided to end this show! My God something that is so important to all of us to help apprehend and keep criminals behind bars! All about the money forget safety!

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  • A different Michael
    4users liked this commentThumbs UpThumbs Down1users disliked this comment

    A different Michaelabout an hour agoReport Abuse

    Rupert Murdoch, are you reading these comments? From one Jew to another, put AMW back on the air, you schmuck.

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  • MissDee
    4users liked this commentThumbs UpThumbs Down1users disliked this comment

    MissDee2 hours agoReport Abuse

    Somebody who’s doing something to stop bad guys, when did heros start getting let go?

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  • Gee
    2users liked this commentThumbs UpThumbs Down0users disliked this comment

    Gee36 minutes agoReport Abuse

    John Walsh should be proud of the service he has performed for America’s children.
    He turned his personal tragedy into public service. Kudos to both him and his wife.

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  • oz
    2users liked this commentThumbs UpThumbs Down0users disliked this comment

    oz44 minutes agoReport Abuse

    If it’s not trash FOX doesn’t want it…John I hope you’re back soon…I agree, OPRAH should pick up this show…fox tries to make good guys look bad…Here’s a good guy who has done great things like “CATCHING BAD PEOPLE”…Not only is FOX racist but stupid…

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  • Kevin
    2users liked this commentThumbs UpThumbs Down0users disliked this comment

    Kevinabout an hour agoReport Abuse

    dearfox network i am very up set that you took amw off theair and i willnot watch your new fallshows this fall sign kevin lane

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  • Red Roses
    2users liked this commentThumbs UpThumbs Down0users disliked this comment

    Red Rosesabout an hour agoReport Abuse

    I like a lot of shows on Fox, but since they are getting rid of AMW is will boycott them.

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  • ROSE M B
    1users liked this commentThumbs UpThumbs Down0users disliked this comment

    ROSE M B24 minutes agoReport Abuse

    ok Fox you have a lot of people against this. what about your own personal message to the people watching FOX? we do not need more smut. we ned the good shows that solves things.

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New York City police officers stand guard outside the Armed Forces recruitment center in New York's Times Square,  Monday, May 2, 2011. The Obama admihttp://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110502/ap_on_re_us/us_bin_laden_dna

By ROBERT BURNS and CALVIN WOODWARD, Associated Press Robert Burns And Calvin Woodward, Associated Press 45 mins ago

WASHINGTON – Knowing there would be disbelievers, the U.S. says it used convincing means to confirm Osama bin Laden’s identity during and after the firefight that killed him. But the mystique that surrounded the terrorist chieftain in life is persisting in death.

Was it really him? How do we know? Where are the pictures?

Already, those questions are spreading in Pakistan and surely beyond. In the absence of photos and with his body given up to the sea, many people don’t want to believe that bin Laden — the Great Emir to some, the fabled escape artist of the Tora Bora mountains to foe and friend alike — is really dead.

U.S. officials are balancing that skepticism with the sensitivities that might be inflamed by showing images they say they have of the dead al-Qaida leader and video of his burial at sea. Still, it appeared likely that photographic evidence would be produced.

“We are going to do everything we can to make sure that nobody has any basis to try to deny that we got Osama bin Laden,” John Brennan, President Barack Obama’s counterterrorism adviser, said Monday. He said the U.S. will “share what we can because we want to make sure that not only the American people but the world understand exactly what happened.”

In July 2009, the U.S. took heat but also quieted most conspiracy theorists by releasing graphic photos of the corpses of Saddam Hussein’s two powerful sons to prove American forces had killed them.

So far, the U.S. has cited evidence that satisfied the Navy SEAL force, and at least most of the world, that they had the right man in Abbottabad, Pakistan.

The helicopter-borne raiding squad that swarmed the luxury compound identified bin Laden by appearance. A woman in the compound who was identified as his wife was said to have called out bin Laden’s name in the melee.

Officials produced a quick DNA match from his remains that they said established bin Laden’s identity, even absent the other techniques, with 99.9 percent certainty. U.S. officials also said bin Laden was identified through photo comparisons and other methods.

Tellingly, an al-Qaida spokesman, in vowing vengeance against America, called him a martyr, offering no challenge to the U.S. account of his death.

Even so, it’s almost inevitable that the bin Laden mythology will not end with the bullet in his head. If it suits extremist ends to spin a fantastical tale of survival or trickery to gullible ears, expect to hear it.

In the immediate aftermath, people in Abbottabad expressed widespread disbelief that bin Laden had died — or ever lived — among them.

“I’m not ready to buy bin Laden was here,” said Haris Rasheed, 22, who works in a fast food restaurant. “How come no one knew he was here and why did they bury him so quickly? This is all fake — a drama, and a crude one.”

Kamal Khan, 25, who is unemployed, said the official story “looks fishy to me.”

The burial from an aircraft carrier in the North Arabian Sea was videotaped aboard the ship, according to a senior defense official who spoke on condition of anonymity because a decision on whether to release the video was not final. The official said it was highly likely that the video, along with photographs of bin Laden’s body, would be made public in coming days.

The swiftness of the burial may have raised suspicions but was in accord with Islamic traditions. Islamic scholars, however, challenged U.S. assertions that a burial at sea was an appropriate fate for a Muslim who had died on land.

The act denied al-Qaida any sort of burial shrine for their slain leader. Once again, bin Laden had vanished, but this time at the hands of the United States and in a way that ensures he is gone forever.

If that satisfies U.S. goals and its sense of justice, Brad Sagarin, a psychologist at Northern Illinois University who studies persuasion, said the rapid disposition of the body “would certainly be a rich sort of kernel for somebody to grasp onto if they were motivated to disbelieve this.”

Also expected to come out is a tape made by bin Laden, before U.S. forces bore down on him, that may provide fodder to those who insist he is alive.

Pakistan, for one, is a land of conspiracy theorists, and far-fetched rumors abound on the streets and in blogs throughout the Arab world. But that’s not just a characteristic of the Islamic pipeline. Many ordinary Americans — and one billionaire — persistently questioned whether Obama was born in the U.S. despite lacking any evidence that he wasn’t.

Sagarin said most people will probably be convinced bin Laden is dead because they cannot imagine the government maintaining such an extraordinary lie to the contrary in this day and age.

Yet, he said, “as with the birther conspiracy, there’s going to be a set of people who are never going to be convinced. People filter the information they receive through their current attitudes, their current perspectives.”

To be sure, even photos and video, subject to digital manipulation, may not provide the final word to everyone. But Seth Jones, a RAND Corp. political scientist who advised the commander of U.S. special operations forces in Afghanistan, said the administration should do all it can to minimize doubts.

“There are always conspiracy theories,” he said. “There are individuals who believe that bin Laden wasn’t involved in the 9/11 attacks.”

__

Associated Press writers Nahal Toosi in Abbottabad, Pakistan; Malcolm Ritter in New York; and Lolita C. Baldor, Ben Feller, Matt Apuzzo and Pauline Jelinek in Washington contributed to this report.

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