Category: mississippi


B.B. King Museum

One of my favorite events during this past school year was going to the B.B. King Museum. When we first arrived the museum didn’t look like your typical museum. That’s because it was the warehouse were B.B. King first got started. One part of the museum is 108 years old!Before we started the tour we watched a movie about B.B. King. Then we started he tour. For a class assignment we had to do a scavenger hunt. We learned many things from doing that assignment. One of the ex-bits I like the most was this bus that we could watch another movie about B.B.. Another ex-bit was a guitar made of bottle caps. Then afterwards we shopped at the gift store then left for Crystals restaurant. The food there amazing! After we left there we left for Grenada. While we were heading back we had the chance to see on of the places that was in the help.

http://www.cdispatch.com/news/article.asp?aid=16271

Dispatch Staff Report

March 27, 2012 3:23:48 PM

 

The third suspect in Saturday’s fatal shooting of a Mississippi State  University turned himself into law enforcement authorities today in  Florida.

 

Trent Deundra Crump, 21, of Flowood, surrendered to authorities, after  investigators with the Mississippi Bureau of Investigations released information  about his travel.

 

MSU officials subsequently issued a public call for help in locating Crump,  who now is being held by the Alachua County Sheriff’s Department in Gainesville,  Fla. on an outstanding capital murder warrant.

 

The two other suspects –Dontae Harvey and Mason Perry Jones, 21, of Jackson  — Monday were arrested and charged with capital murder in the death of John  Sanderson, 21, who recently transferred to MSU from Holmes Community  College.

 

“The dedication and hard work of our campus police and the extraordinary  cooperation of assisting law enforcement agencies have resulted in the swift  apprehension of those we believe are responsible for this tragic incident,” said  MSU President Dr. Mark Keenum.

 

Sanderson was shot multiple times outside a dorm room on the first floor of  Evans Hall, Saturday night.

 

Police have not disclosed a possible motive for the crime, but MSU  spokeswoman Maridith Geuder said the sale of a controlled substance is the  underlying charge in the capital murder charge.

 

Sanderson, who lived in Rice Hall, probably was “visiting”  Evans Hall the  night of the shooting, said MSU Vice President of Student Affairs Bill  Kibler.

 

Evans Hall, one of the older dormitories on campus, is arranged as a  quadrangle. The first floor, where the incident occurred, opens into a  courtyard. The three higher floors have balconies overlooking the courtyard.  Evans Hall, which holds about 300 male students, has two main entrances — the  north entrance accesses the first floor and the south entrance accesses the  second floor, which features a game room and office, along with residents’  rooms.

 

“This is the first time in our school’s history that such a tragic event has  occurred involving a student being shot on campus,”  Keenum said Sunday. “Our  campus is known as a safe place, and I want to assure students, parents, faculty  and staff that it continues to be safe.”

 

Entry to dormitory rooms is gained through three levels requiring key-card  access — at exterior entrances, entrances to wings or floors and at residents’  rooms.

 

However, the key-card access system was not activated at the time of the  shooting, which occurred before 10 p.m. And, Kibler noted, non-residents can be  brought into the dorm by residents, at any hour.

 

The contents of this article have been modified since its original  posting.

 

 

 

http://www.cdispatch.com/news/article.asp?aid=16254

Slim Smith, Dispatch Correspondent

March 26, 2012 12:59:20 PM

 

STARKVILLE – An arrest was made Sunday in connection with the weekend fatal  shooting of a Mississippi State University student.

 

MSU Police Chief Georgia Lindley today confirmed Mason Perry Jones was  arrested for the death of MSU student John Sanderson, 21, of Madison, who died  of multiple gun-shot wounds following a shooting at Evans Hall dormitory shortly  before 10 p.m. Saturday.

 

Jones was arrested in Memphis about 7 p.m. Sunday, by the U.S. Marshal’s  Fugitive Task Force. Jones was arrested on an outstanding armed robbery warrant  out of Jackson, which was not related to Saturday’s shooting, Lindley said,  noting UPD was informed by the marshal’s service on Sunday afternoon an arrest  was imminent and informed of the arrest, as soon as it was made. Though he has  been arrested, charges have yet to be brought against Jones.

 

“The U.S. Marshal’s Service was one of many agencies that have volunteered to  help us in the investigation,” Lindley said. “They came in (Sunday) afternoon  and began working the case. We are very grateful for all of the assistance.  Obviously, this is a very important matter to us.”

 

Lindley would not confirm Jones is the primary suspect and would not  elaborate on whether police now know the identities of two other men sought in  connection with the shooting. The UPD has not yet interviewed Jones and Lindley  would not comment on whether other agencies have interviewed Jones, as part of  the investigation.

 

Witnesses reported three black males were involved in the shooting and left  the scene in a late-model blue Crown Victoria.

 

Police recovered a handgun on campus early Sunday morning. Surveillance tapes  from cameras at the entrances of Evans Hall were being reviewed as a part of the  investigation, said Bill Kibler, Vice President of Student Affairs at  MSU.

 

“Our goal now is to identify the suspects and bring them into custody  immediately,” Kibler said Sunday. He declined to reveal a possible motive for  the shooting, but said police had information from witnesses who “knew what was  taking place.”

 

Evans Hall, one of the older dormitories on campus, is arranged as a  quadrangle. The first floor, where the incident occurred, opens into a  courtyard. The higher floors have balconies overlooking the courtyard. Evans  Hall has two main entrances — the north entrance accesses the first floor and  the south entrance accesses the second floor, which features a game room and  office, along with residents’ rooms.

 

Kibler said the shooting took place outside one of the first floor dorm rooms  and 24 students subsequently were relocated from their first-floor rooms to  preserve the integrity of the crime scene.

 

“This is the first time in our school’s history that such a tragic event has  occurred involving a student being shot on campus,” MSU President Dr. Mark  Keenum said Sunday. “Our campus is known as a safe place, and I want to assure  students, parents, faculty and staff that it continues to be safe.”

 

Entry to dormitory rooms is gained through three levels requiring key-card  access — at exterior entrances, entrances to wings or floors and at residents’  rooms.

 

However, the key-card access system was activated at the time of the  incident, which occurred before 10 p.m. And, Kibler noted, non-residents can be  brought into the dorm by residents, at any hour.

 

A deadly shooting spree on the campus of Virginia Tech in 2007 – when almost  two hours passed before students/staff/faculty were notified that a shooting had  taken place – led to changes on campuses across the country to get the word out  more quickly.

 

Ben Grace, an MSU freshman who lives in Evans Hall, Sunday said he received a  torrent of text messages after the incident.

 

“I was getting all these texts and I’m thinking, “Why is everyone texting  me?” Then I got a call from a friend and he told me what happened. I just  grabbed my laptop and went over to stay with a friend at South Hall.”

 

Another Evans Hall resident, Phillip Bajoras, said he walked into the North  Entrance at about 10 p.m. Saturday.

 

“There were a lot of people standing around and I was wondering what was  going on,” he recalled. “Somebody was saying somebody got stabbed. Somebody  else said he was shot, but nobody said they heard any gunshots.”

 

Barojas said he looked over the balcony and could see the victim, who was  being attended to by “a couple of people” just outside one of the rooms while  police were clearing the courtyard.

 

Having recently transferred from Holmes Community College, Sanderson was in  his first semester at MSU.

Read more: http://www.cdispatch.com/news/article.asp?aid=16254#ixzz1qGffjJZj

No Bolivar County burn ban yet

http://www.bolivarcom.com/view/full_story/13968088/article-No-Bolivar-County-burn-ban-yet?instance=most_recommended

Not only here in Bolivar County but across the Mississippi Delta over the past  several weeks, dark clouds of rising smoke have cluttered the horizon in every  direction.

The voices of many a concerned citizen ring loudly in boards  of aldermen and supervisors meetings in the towns that litter the landscape of  the Mississippi Delta, but they are, more often than not, ringing on deaf  ears.

“I am concerned. I am concerned for the private properties that  surround many of the burning fields, but I am more concerned with the  potentially devastating effect that the smoke will likely have on the  environment. Only living in the Delta for a few years, I cannot believe that the  EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) has not stepped in and put an end to these  senseless burnings,” said one citizen at one of these small town Delta  meetings.

“There is some legitimate concern there,” said a representative  from the Mississippi Forestry Commission. “But the simple truth is that by law  we cannot step in until we are asked by the individual county board of  supervisors.

Last year, Gov. Haley Barbour, passed a law banning any  burns within the boarders of the state of Mississippi.

This was because  of the drought affecting much of the state and the fear that these ‘wildfires’ would ultimately burn out of control causing severe damages to adjoining  properties.

However, there are some that benefit from these  burnings.

Farmers have a tough job. Every year they are fighting the odds — Mother Nature, new machinery, higher fuel prices and lower commodity prices  just to name a few.

In their minds, burning fields is a simple, cost  effective way of removing crop stubble from the fields that have been harvested  in preparation of planting the new crops.

Area farmers have been burning  fields for years. Their fathers did it and now they are simply following in the  process.

However, this year has been undeniably worse than others of  recent memory due to the fact that the county has had more wheat planted this  year than in years passed.

The high winds that often torment this area of  the U.S. during the spring and early summer months makes the process of burning  that much more of a sensitive and dangerous topic.

Again, burn bans are  requested by the county board of supervisors before being approved by the  Mississippi Forestry Commission.

Several Mississippi Counties currently  find themselves under burn bans, such as Amite, Copiah, George, Hancock,  Harrison, Jackson, Jones, Lincoln, Marion, Pike and Stone.

Read more:  The Bolivar Commercial – No Bolivar County burn ban yet

 

 

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