Tag Archive: classes


the school year is almost over

Hey everyone! So it’s almost that time of the year again. The end of the school year. It’s a relief that it’s about to end, but bittersweet in away.  Mostly because this is my last year of high school and the fact that I really didn’t much during my four years of high school. I know that many of you will think that it’s weird for me to say that, but it’s the truth. I know I should be happy and everything, but a part of me feels kindof sad to be leaving.  I have many wonderful memories that I know I’ll remember for the rest of my life, and I’vwe made many friends that I’ll miss.(most of them are underclassmen). But, I know that everything will be ok. I start college in August with a couple of friends and I know that’ll be fun. I’ll keep ya’ll post on more senior stuff and I’ll possible do a series on college life. Later!

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School board adopts sex ed policy

http://www.grenadastar.com/v2/content.aspx?module=ContentItem&ID=231273&MemberID=1218

By LEANN McCOY
Staff Writer

1/13/2012

The Grenada School Board has decided to adopt an “abstinence only” form of sex education to be compliant with a new state law.
According to Lynne Russell, director of community services, school districts across the state are required to teach sex education at all levels under a new law signed last year by former Gov. Haley Barbour.
“We have always taught an abstinence program, and our current program is in compliance with the new state regulation,” Russell said during Tuesday’s meeting.
The current program will be expanded to include all grades. Before, it was just taught at the middle school and high school, according to Russell.
“The program will teach abstinence, but it will be at an appropriate level of understanding for each grade,” Russell said.
Under the new law, the decision was left up to each school board as to teaching abstinence-only education, which teaches that abstaining from sex is the best way, or a comprehensive class called abstinence-plus.
In the comprehensive setting, the student would learn that abstinence was the best way, but would be taught safe sex practices, about birth control and the different sexually-transmitted diseases.
The board unanimously approved the program with a motion by District Two Board Member Dr. David Braswell, seconded by District Three Board Member Arlene Conley.

Other business

The board entered into executive session with a motion by Braswell, seconded by Hughes, to discuss potential litigation and personnel issues.
According to Daigneault, no official action was taken, and he could not discuss specific details of the executive session.
This is at least the first known executive session the school board has entered into that excluded the taxpaying public.
All board members were present including District Five Board Member Keith Watson.

Senior Prom

So, anyways prom is coming up in April. This is the first dance I’ll be going to and I’m little nervous. I just don’t know what to expect. I just hope that I don’t trip and fall on my face on the dance floor and that the movie Carrie is after all a movie. lol So, it’s your turn tell me what to expect or tell me the do’s and don’t of prom and please like.

Laters!

 

SENIORS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Hello everyone. What’s up? Things here are going get. This week we had the senior auction. Most of the money that was earn went to Mrs. Hardman’s family. Then on Friday there was a pep rally. It was a little bitter-sweet because that was the last pep rally I will be attending in high school. 😦 Yesterday, I had to take the ACT. So anyways, this week we have the senior slide show. We were supposed to have it Friday but it was moved to this coming up Friday because it wasn’t  finished. I’m so going to miss high school after I graduate.(well some stuff I’ll miss anyway) I’m still looking for ideas for blogs so when I come up with some I’ll be sure to post them and let me know what ya’ll think. Later!

Arab strongman: With Gadhafi death, an era passes

FILE - This undated photo shows Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi. A U.S. official says Libya's new government has told the United States that Gadhafi, 69, is dead. The official said Libya's Transitional National Council informed U.S. officials in Libya of the development Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011. His death on Thursday, confirmed by Prime Minister Mahmoud Jibril, came as Libyan fighters defeated Gadhafi's last holdouts in his hometown of Sirte, the last major site of resistance in the country. (AP Photo/File)http://news.yahoo.com/arab-strongman-gadhafi-death-era-passes-151535237.html

CAIRO (AP) — He often looked like a comical buffoon, standing before audiences, bedecked in colorful robes, spouting words that most of the world considered nonsense.

Yet the death of Moammar Gadhafi was a milestone in modern Arab history, in some ways more significant than the overthrow of lesser autocrats in Tunisia and Egypt.

Gadhafi was the last of the old-style Arab strongmen — the charismatic, nationalist revolutionaries who rose to power in the 1950s and 1960s, promising to liberate the masses from the shackles of European colonialism and the stultifying rule of the Arab elite that the foreigners left behind after World War II.

He was swept aside by a new brand of revolutionary — the leaderless crowds organized by social media, fed up with the oppressive past, keenly aware that the rest of the world has left them behind and convinced that they can build a better society even if at the moment, they aren’t sure how.

Gadhafi was the last of a generation of Arab leaders such as Gamal Abdel-Nasser of Egypt, Hafez Assad of Syria and Saddam Hussein of Iraq who emerged from poverty, rising to the pinnacle of power either through the ranks of the military or the disciplined, conspiratorial world of underground political organizations.

None of the latter crop of Arab autocrats, including Assad’s son Bashar, Yemen’s Ali Abdullah Saleh and even Egypt’s colorless, ousted president Hosni Mubarak, could rival them in their heyday in terms of charisma, flair, stature and power.

Their model was Nasser, the towering champion of Arab unity who ousted Western-backed King Farouk in 1952 and inspired Arab peoples with fiery speeches broadcast by Egyptian radio from Iraq to Mauritania.

But Nasser’s dreams of Arab unity and social revival crumbled in defeat in the 1967 Arab-Israeli War, when Israel seized East Jerusalem, the West Bank, the Golan Heights from Syria and the Gaza Strip and Sinai Peninsula from Egypt. Nasser died three years later, and the fellow strongmen left behind led their countries instead into a political swamp of corruption, cronyism and dictatorship now challenged by the Arab Spring.

The hallmark of the Arab strongman was unquestioned power, the use of state media to promote a larger than life image and a ruthless security network that stifled even a whiff of dissent. That worked in an age before the Internet and global satellite television which opened the eyes of the strongman’s followers to a world without secret police and economic systems run by the leader’s family and cronies.

The Arab political transformation is far from complete. Autocratic rulers are facing challenges from their own people in Yemen and Syria. Bahrain’s Shiite majority is pressing the Sunni monarchy for reform. Rulers in Jordan, Saudi Arabia and the Gulf states are maneuvering to contain the Arab Spring.

Iraq is struggling to build a democracy eight years after American-led arms brought down Saddam’s rule.

With Gadhafi’s passing, however, a milestone has been passed. The future belongs to a different style of ruler, whoever it may be.

It may be difficult to imagine that the Gadhafi of his final years — with his flamboyant robes, dark and curly wigs and sagging, surgically altered face — was a trim, handsome, vigorous 27-year-old when he came to power as a strong and vigorous leader. Over the years he had become a caricature figure associated with grandiose dreams such as a “United States of Africa” or seizing all of Israel and sending Jews “back to Europe.”

Even when he was younger, eccentricity was the mark of Gadhafi’s public persona.

A generation ago, President Ronald Reagan described him as the “mad dog of the Middle East,” and his fellow Arab leaders such as Egyptian President Anwar Sadat considered him a dangerous megalomaniac.

Journalists covered his speeches and international visits primarily for amusement.

Images of Gadhafi’s final moments — toupee gone, terrified, confused, powerless in the grip of men who may be about to kill him — make the ousted tyrant appear more pitiable than powerful.

All that was far from his image when he and his comrades toppled a Western-backed monarchy in 1969 in a bloodless coup, promising to transform his poor, backwater country into a modern state.

Promising a new era for his people, Gadhafi closed a U.S. air base, forced international oil companies to hand over most of their profits from Libyan oil to the Libyan state and shook the world with his unabashed support for terrorist or insurgent movements in Northern Ireland, Palestine, Latin America, Africa and Asia.

Oil gave him a reach beyond his sparsely populated desert land and enabled him to pursue his revolutionary dreams.

In the 1980s, the lobbies of Tripoli’s few hotels were populated by representatives of what the West considered the most dangerous groups on Earth — stiff North Koreans wearing lapel buttons of their leader Kim Il-Sung, Palestinian extremists huddled over cups of sweet tea, European anarchists and revolutionaries — all come to town to seek the oil-fueled largesse of the “Brother Leader.”

While insisting that Libya was the freest nation on Earth, Gadhafi ruthlessly suppressed dissent, dispatched agents to assassinate his opponents abroad and drove thousands of Libyans into exile.

It all came crashing down in the final battle in his hometown of Sirte. A man who came to power as an Arab revolutionary and self-styled leader of the oppressed and downtrodden died a brutal and inglorious death at the hands of the people he purported to lead.

___

Eds: Robert H. Reid is Middle East regional editor for The Associated Press and has reported from the Middle East since 1978.

My last first nine weeks

Hey! What’s up? The first nine week are almost over. This week we are having nine weeks exams. The good thing about having five classes you don’t have to worry about taking some many tests. The down side is my schedule was a little messed up. (not much though) My teacher is planning to take a group of students to London and Paris. I’m no sure if I’ll be going on that.(I’ll be sure to let ya’ll know if I’ll be going or not). Other than all that there’s nothing much is going on here. In other news, I’m thinking about writing more poetry. So, be looking for that. I’m also looking for ideas for more blog posts so if you have any ideas please leave a comment and I’ll see what I can do. Later!

homecoming week

Hey what’s up!?! Homecoming is now over for Grenada High School. Well it should be soon (that’s if the football game isn’t over yet.) This week was kind of fun. They let us dress up as cartoon characters and let us dress tacky. lol The pep rally was also interesting. They had this thing called kiss the pig, which was really funny. For those who have never seen that it’s were you can vote to have one of the teachers kiss this cute little pig. I tried to get a picture of that but couldn’t. 😦 I did however get pictures of some of my fellow seniors in their togs. 🙂  Well anyways please leave a comment and tell me if there’s any topics I should cover about senior year or any other topic. later.

last first day of high school

Well, this was my “last” first day of school. It was ok. I only had five classes.(that may change) I still don’t know why they messed up my classes.(talked to the people who are in charge of that and didn’t get many answers) But, other than that things did go pretty smoothly for the most part. My teachers are great.(but we had a sub. in one of my classes) My only concerns for right now are my credits and the ACT. I’m soory I dont have anything real interseting to put in todays post, but I’m hoping that I’ll have some things to put as the year goes on. Oh yea there is the whole issue about how I’m getting home. If my dad comes and gets me then I’ll have to rod the bus in the morning or I can either get one of my senior friends to take me home or I can stay in the library and catch the bus home. I’m not sure what I’m going todo yet, but I’ll let ya’ll guys know. Later!

All I wanted was a decent senior year

My senior year is about to start in a few weeks, finally. I’m excited that I’ll get to graduate and be done with high school for good. But, due to my mom losing her job earlier this year I wont be able to get to do many of the things that the rest of my senior class will get to do.

I wonder how we’ll be able to afford things life my cap and gown for graduation. I guess we’ll have to figure that when we get there. At least I’ll get my diploma (hopefully) by the end of this  year,

and I’ll get to start me life anew. All I need is prayer.

http://www.cultofmac.com/ivisor-ag-bubble-free-screen-protector-for-ipad-2-review/90215

So, here’s the 4th installment of the ipod/ipad updates. Hope you enjoy.

Today on google I found a review on the iVisor AG.

For the most part the writer of this article seem to like the iVisor AG. He says that he doesn’t like to use them. He also give the reasons why he doesn’t like to use them. He gives a good review of the iVisor AG.

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