Tag Archive: Curt Knox


Amanda Knox’s dad: ABC producer gave kids her room

http://news.yahoo.com/amanda-knoxs-dad-abc-producer-gave-kids-her-233513864.html

NEW YORK (AP) — The courtship of Amanda Knox’s family by American television networks eager to win an exclusive interview with her extended to providing temporary accommodations for two of her younger sisters.

Knox’s father, Curt Knox, said Friday that an ABC producer let his daughters Ashley, 16, and Delaney, 13, stay in her room while court was in session. He said a CBS producer did, too, and an NBC producer offered to.

Amanda Knox, 24, returned to the United States on Tuesday after an Italian court overturned her murder conviction in the death of her roommate. The former exchange student from Seattle had been in custody since 2007.

Networks are competing for an interview with her, even before it’s clear if she’ll even tell her story in that venue. There has been increased attention lately on how networks get these interviews, with ABC declaring this summer it would no longer pay interview subjects to license photos or videos, seen as a dodge of the common journalistic practice of not paying people to tell their stories.

Producers might be able to help the Knoxes see if they could find care for their teenage daughters, but offering something with a specific monetary value — their hotel rooms — isn’t a good idea, said Kelly McBride, senior faculty member for ethics at the Poynter Institute, a journalism think tank.

Even without a specific expectation of something in return, “it is unfair to the source because they are in a position of vulnerability,” McBride said.

Curt Knox said that although ABC producer Nikki Battiste permitted his children to use her room, she was doing her job and did not babysit the teenagers. He said Battiste wasn’t in the room with them.

ABC News spokeswoman Jeffrey Schneider said the network didn’t have a problem with Battiste’s actions.

Knox said that CBS producer Sabina Castelfranco also permitted the children to use her room. But CBS spokeswoman Sonya McNair denied this, saying Castelfranco turned down the request when asked and checked out of the small hotel. McNair said it was unclear whether the room was made available to the children after Castelfranco checked out.

Knox said NBC producer Stephanie Siegel offered her room but it wasn’t used. NBC spokeswoman Lauren Kapp denied that such an offer was made.

Battiste and Siegel also accompanied Knox’s wife and the two girls on a shopping trip near the Italian courtroom but didn’t buy anything for the family, he said.

It’s unclear whether any efforts by networks to ingratiate themselves with Knox will make any difference.

“The kind gesture to allow my younger daughters, who couldn’t get into the courtroom due to age, will not have any influence as to which network, if any, that Amanda may choose to go with in the future,” he said.

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For Amanda Knox, freedom comes at hefty cost

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2011/10/05/earlyshow/main20115856.shtml

(CBS/AP)

Amanda Knox left Seattle as an anonymous junior attending Washington’s
flagship public university, and on Tuesday she returned as someone whose release
from an Italian jail made her internationally recognizable.

 

But her freedom came with a price, CBS News correspondent Hattie Kauffman
reports.

 

The 24-year-old’s life turned around dramatically Monday when an Italian
appeals court threw out her conviction in the sexual assault and fatal stabbing
of her British roommate. On Tuesday, photos of Amanda Knox crying in the
courtroom after the verdict was read appeared on the front pages of newspapers
in Italy, the U.S., Britain and around the world.

 

 

Special Section:
The Appeal Trial of Amanda Knox

Amanda
Knox: I’m overwhelmed right now

Amanda
Knox’s alleged accomplice wants retrial

 

 

Knox’s first challenge will be repaying the more than $1 million in legal
debts her family piled up in the past two years.

Her parents each took out second mortgages and drained retirement accounts to
pay for her lawyers. Elizabeth Huff, Knox’s grandmother, took out a $250,000
loan to help pay bills, a burden she welcomed.

 

“We are happy; we are elated,” Huff said. “I can’t tell you how happy we
are.”

 

With the international media frenzy that surrounded Knox’s trial continuing
on the journey home — from her flight out of Rome to her landing in Seattle —
there’s no sign the interest in Knox or her story will let up soon. That could
open up an avenue for the family to pay off those debts.

Sources close to Knox tell CBS News that she began to write a memoir while in
prison. That could be worth millions to publishers eager to profit on one of the
most sensational international legal cases in memory.

On CBS’ “The Early Show” Wednesday, Knox’s U.S. attorney, Theodore Simon, said
her writings weren’t discussed during her reunion with family and friends
Tuesday night.

 

 

 

(Watch at left)

 

 

“I’m sure there’s going to be a lot more to come, but I can tell you very
candidly none of those things were discussed last night in any way,” Simon told
“Early Show” co-anchor Erica Hill. “In fact, Amanda is much more about asking
people how they are as opposed to explaining herself, and it was only after much
time and some curiosity where others started asking some questions about her
prison experience, and when everyone hears about all of those I think they are
really going to be really amazed.”

 

As for Knox’s future, her father, Curt Knox, said she would like to return to
the University of Washington at some point to finish her degree.

 

For now, he’s apprehensive about what four years in prison may have done to
his daughter, though there are no immediate plans for her to get counseling.
“What’s the trauma … and when will it show up, if it even shows up?” he told
The Associated Press. “She’s a very strong girl, but it’s been a tough time for
her.”

For now, Knox has just one priority.

 

“My family’s the most important thing to me right now, and I just want to go
be with them,” Knox told reporters Tuesday night. “Thank you for being there for
me.”

 

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