Tag Archive: Draco Malfoy


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http://www.suntimes.com/entertainment/movies/10217281-421/daniel-radcliffe-will-never-bury-harry.html

Updated: January 26, 2012 6:17PM

He will always be Harry. Daniel Radcliffe makes that fact perfectly clear. You’re playing a game of “what if” with one of the most recognizable faces on the globe, and the good-natured 22-year-old is like an eager puppy.

What if J.K. Rowling wrote another Harry Potter book?

What if it was turned into another film?

What if they wanted him to be the middle-aged Potter someday? He wouldn’t need to have a gut, but still, could he put on the specs again?

“If it was good enough, I would be Harry Potter again. If it was anything short of good enough, I would say no,” Radcliffe says. “I know I wouldn’t be Harry again for nostalgic or dutiful reasons.

“But if I learned one thing in life, it’s that it’s foolish to cut yourself off from anything. My motto is to never say never.”

It’s that motto that’s bringing him into his post-Potter career. After starring in the beloved wizardry franchise with worldwide grosses of over $7.7 billion, he is ready to put down his wand for at least a little while.

“I’ve had a lovely first year away from being Harry,” he says. “I made this movie and did a Broadway show.”

The movie is “The Woman in Black,” opening Friday. Radcliffe plays a widowed lawyer named Arthur Kipps who travels to a remote village to make sense of a recently deceased client’s papers. Instead of staying at some friendly local hotel, he decides to lodge at a creepy old mansion where he encounters a mystery woman dressed in all black. It’s the ghost of a scorned woman who has a yen for vengeance.

It begs the question: Why not run out of there screaming and book yourself at a nice, ghost-free Embassy Suites?

“I was even asking, ‘Why the hell does he stay in the house?’ I want to grab this character, shake him and tell him that he’s not going to do well staying in that haunted dwelling,” Radcliffe says.

“I resolved this question saying to myself, ‘Here is a young man who has lost the wife he loved. He’s almost seeking a guarantee that she is in a better place and they will be reunited someday.’

“He stays in the house because of the power of curiosity,” he says. “Curiosity is what makes us human. The character I play, regardless of what happens, needs to know what happened in this house with this woman in black.

“In the end, the film is about how grief touches people.”

It’s also about those classic horror movie moments that have you dropping your popcorn.

When you’re Harry Potter, however, getting your chills isn’t easy.

“There’s a moment where the ghost sneaks up to me at the window. I didn’t even know how bad it would be until I saw the first cut of the film,” Radcliffe says. “The director simply told me, ‘Just walk to the window and then walk away again.’ He didn’t tell me that there would be any major special effects there.

“When I saw the film I almost lost my lower half. Even on the set, the crew guys were quite protective of me. They knew the ghost effects were going to be chilling. I saw some grown men on the crew mouth the words, ‘Daniel, move!’ People who have seen the film are screaming, ‘Dan, get out of there!’ ”

In the New York apartment where he has lived alone for the last year, Radcliffe says he was turning on a few lights in the middle of the night when the shoot was done and he was on Broadway performing “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying.”

“The bad news is that my dogs live with my mom and dad now. I’ve moved out,” he says. “I couldn’t take the dogs with me because I’m so busy that they would never eat again.

“You need dogs in your house when you make a horror movie to check out the noises,” he quips.

His parents are Alan Radcliffe, a literary agent, and Marcia Gresham, a casting director, two people who always supported his yen to act. They helped him audition for school plays and supported his decision to take it even further and go pro.

His first major role was in a 1999 TV version of “David Copperfield.” In 2001, he was in “The Tailor of Panama” as the son of Geoffrey Rush and Jamie Lee Curtis.

David Heyman, the producer of the Harry Potter films, attended a play where he met Daniel and his father in the audience.

“At that moment, I looked at Dan and thought, ‘He is Harry Potter,’ ” Heyman says of casting Radcliffe in 2001’s “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.”

The Potter franchise, concluding with last year’s “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2” (2011), became Radcliffe’s childhood album.

“I’m seriously proud of the last two films,” he says. “They so far surpassed my dreams. It’s great to hear from people who didn’t even see the other films and have no emotional connection loving the last film.”

Some thought he deserved an Oscar nomination for playing Potter. “People asked about my chances and I say I would be more likely to get hit by an Oscar if it came flying at me,” he said.

“I don’t need anything else. I had the role of a lifetime.”

He came away with some Potter souvenirs. “I got two pairs of the glasses. All I had to do was ask,” he says with a laugh. “I have one pair of glasses from the first film and one from the last.”

Radcliffe hopes to wind up behind the camera. “I would love to direct,” he says, fretting, “The problem is I’d employ all of my friends. I wouldn’t have a single unpleasant person around me.

“But I would love to step behind the camera and stay in front of it, too,” he says. “Life is full of possibilities.”

The only thing not possible: Developing a star attitude.

“I’m just a crazy kind of actor who just cares about the work,” Radcliffe says. “The truth is I didn’t get an attitude over the last several years, which was a conscious choice. Why get an attitude when your job is to be a wizard and defeat evil and fly through the air? It’s a good job.

“I’m just a bad movie star!” he cries. “But the truth is I’ve always had an intrinsic dislike of people with attitudes. I never trusted those kinds of people.

“If I ever became that kind of actor, I’d have to sit myself down … and have a talk with myself.”

Big Picture News Inc.

http://thecelebritycafe.com/feature/details-daniel-radcliffes-new-girlfriend-08-21-2011

Bridgette Nealon

The internet started buzzing this week over Harry Potter star’s new mystery girl. Paparazzi caught the actor holding hands with a mystery girl earlier this week. No one seemed to be able to identify the young brunette for days.

Now, E! online revealed that the girl that has Radcliffe smitten is Rosanne Coker — although everyone seems to call her Rose.

Ms. Coker is 22 years old and a painter. Her father owns a painting and decorating business and her mother designs birthday cards. They reside in Surry, England. Also, the girl is an avid painter.

Coker’s family seems to approve of the actor dating their daughter. Her father told reporters “No other parent would ask any more. I know it’s not a normal life they live. But they have a lot of fun together and, at their age, what more could you ask?

The couple met on the set of Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince in 2007 when Coker worked as a production assistant. She worked on the last two Potter films, as well as Radcliffe’s new film The Woman in Black as a production assistant.

 

FILE - In this July 11, 2011 file photo, cast members, from left, Tom Felton, Emma Watson, Daniel Radcliffe and Rupert Grint pose together at the premiere of "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2" at Avery Fisher Hall in New York. The film is the eighth and final film in the Harry Potter series. (AP Photo/Evan Agostini, file)http://news.yahoo.com/stars-mull-options-potter-hadnt-come-calling-125914106.html

LOS ANGELES (AP) — In some fantasy world, Daniel Radcliffe might be a low-level go-fer on movie sets. Emma Watson might be a nobody auditioning for stage plays. Tom Felton might be noodling around as a musician. And Rupert Grint might be selling ice cream on the street.

With the finale “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2” arriving this week, the young stars of one of Hollywood’s biggest film franchises pondered what they might be doing if the acting thing hadn’t worked out.

Radcliffe:

An 11-year-old when picked for the title role of the “Harry Potter” franchise, Radcliffe figures that since his parents worked in the arts — his mother as a casting director, his father as a literary agent — he would have ended up in show business. But not as an actor, probably as an assistant director.

“What probably would have happened, when I got to about 17, 18, and it became apparent, as it would have done, to my parents that I wasn’t going to be going to university, I’m sure they probably would have tried to get me, like, an internship on a film as a runner. And then I’d just try to work my way up the A.D. ladder from there,” said Radcliffe, whose pre-“Harry Potter” acting work included the title role in a British television production of “David Copperfield.”

“To this day, I still fancy myself as a bit of an A.D. Anyone who works with me will tell you if they give me a radio, I constantly kind of try to run messages between people, that I always like to know exactly what’s going on around the set. So if somebody’s saying, ‘Where’s so and so? We need them now,’ I can go, ‘They’re there. That person’s coming back. They’ve just gone to the toilet.’ I really like to know exactly what’s going on at all times on set, because I like to feel that’s another way in which I can make myself useful.”

Watson:

Just 10 when she was cast as bookish Hermione Granger, Watson had no previous professional acting experience. Yet she’s convinced that no matter how she would have gone on to make a living, acting still would have been part of her life.

“I would have found some way to end up acting, performing. I mean, obviously, not on this scale, but I would have been doing it, I’m sure,” Watson said. “I would have been doing plays. I’m almost a hundred percent sure I would be doing plays, I would be acting. I mean, that would be a sideline thing for me. I would be focusing toward some kind of career that I’m not really sure of now, but I definitely would have been performing, some way or another.”

Grint:

Also a screen newcomer when chosen at 11 to play jittery but stalwart sidekick Ron Weasley, Grint finds it daunting to imagine a life in which he never landed among the “Harry Potter” clan.

“I don’t know. It’s quite a scary thought. I saw recently, they put on one of the DVDs, footage from our screen tests when we were first kind of auditioning. In one of them, there was a test with Emma and Dan with a different Ron, another kid who was auditioning at the same time. That was very weird to see that, because he was good. I probably would have picked him.

“It was weird to think what I’d be doing now. … I’d have probably gone down the art route. I wanted to design hats for a while when I was really young. And being an ice cream man was another dream, but I’ve kind of let go of that now. I bought an ice cream van and brought it up, actually, on the last day and served ice cream to the crew. I don’t really drive it too much now, because you get people queuing up on the street.”

Felton:

Like Radcliffe and Watson, the guy who co-starred as bullying Draco Malfoy expects he would have wound up doing some sort of creative work. Also like Radcliffe, Felton had previous acting experience before “Harry Potter,” appearing in the fantasy film “The Borrowers” and Jodie Foster’s “Anna and the King.”

“My brother and I often talk about it. Where would I be and what would I be doing? I like to think something creative. I’ve always been fairly minded that way, certainly with music and fooling around as a kid with a video camera,” said Felton, who was 12 when cast in “Harry Potter.” ”I’d like to think it would be something in that realm.

“It certainly was not going to be sitting behind an office. If I did, I wouldn’t be happy doing it. So I’ve been very lucky that I’ve been able to follow a passion of mine from a very young age. A lot of people aren’t so fortunate. A lot of friends now are working jobs they can’t stand just so they can get enough money to go traveling or to start their own business or to do whatever they want. I’ve just been blessed to start in the industry that I want to continue with.”

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