Tag Archive: Europe


http://news.yahoo.com/amanda-knox-slips-seclusion-brief-shopping-trip-120104427.html

Amanda Knox, who has been in seclusion since her release from an Italian prison, is finally venturing out.

Her return to the public was no more than a trip to a store for toothpaste and a chocolate bar, but it was a deliciously simple act that had been denied her during her four years in an Italian prison.

Ironically, one of her last acts in prison was the inmate ritual of snapping her toothbrush and carrying it outside the walls of Capanne prison before throwing it away.

Knox’s foray into the public comes as more details of her prison ordeal emerge, specifically how she was sexually harassed.

Knox’s younger sister Deanna told ABC News that she saw the remnants of the harassment firsthand while visiting her sister in prison.

“There was something right in front of me and so I put my arm over it,” Deanna Knox said.

Deanna Knox said she covered up scribbled words that read “Amanda is a whore.”

On one occasion, a male guard reportedly entered Knox’s cell alone, despite a policy against it, and made sexual remarks, ABC News has confirmed. On another occasion, a high ranking prison official allegedly ordered Knox into his office at night and wanted to talk about sex.

Amanda Knox Was Sexually Harassed in Prison

“I think the Italian courts…the first time around practically made sure that Amanda was going to be harassed in prison since they made her sex life so much of a focus of the first trial, ” said Vanity Fair’s Judy Bachrach who has covered the case extensively.

Shortly after her arrest, prison officials tricked Knox, falsely telling her that her medical check-up revealed that she was HIV positive and asked her for a list of lovers for health reasons. The list that a distraught Knox provided to officials was soon leaked and became headlines in tabloid newspapers.

“Please oh please,” she wrote in her prison diary at the time. “Let it not be true. I don’t want to die.”

ABC News legal analyst Dan Abrams said that Knox could have the basis for a lawsuit but filing one would require a return to Italy.

Knox, 24, was released from prison earlier this month when she and her former boyfriend Raffaele Sollecito, 27, successfully appealed their murder conviction. They had been accused of murdering Knox’s British roommate Meredith Kercher in a cottage the two women shared in Perugia, Italy.

Sollecito has not spoken publicly since his release but his father told the press that his son is getting used to being at home.

“It’s as if he has been reborn and he is getting used to the simple things in life again, things that he has not been able to do for four years and this will take some time,” said Francesco Sollecito.

Meanwhile, a juror who overturned Knox’s conviction told Italy’s state-run RAI television that he has no doubt that Knox and Sollecito are innocent.

“I saw the faces of these two kids, and they couldn’t bluff. They didn’t bluff. My point of view is that these kids weren’t guilty. They weren’t there,” said Mauro Chialli.

<iframe src=”http://platform.twitter.com/widgets/follow_button.html?screen_name=yahoonews&show_count=0&show_screen_name=0&width=61&height=22&lang=en&#8221; frameborder=”0″ scrolling=”no” style=”width:61px;height:22px;”> </iframe>

@yahoonews on Twitter, become a fan on Facebook

Editors’ Picks

<img src=”http://geo.yahoo.com/p?s=7645365&pt=storypage&t=1456589774&sec=MediaInfiniteBrowse&ret=8e24da82-6d8c-593c-9ab7-034627323c94%3Ad69c394e-7c42-342a-bbbc-afc3b9b695c9%3Ac26b7f64-2ad1-5f52-a2d4-69bacfce3da2%3A1478b785-655f-3867-874f-49e6e54c6c51&pstaid=493bc076-c776-30cd-9299-2d35bc40a4c8&csrcpvid=pI9H2kPDlDlyfyslTpMWjwGYQzxzPE6TNjIAAGif&#8221; style=”position:absolute;” />

// <![CDATA[
ugccmt_data2 = {"context_id":"493bc076-c776-30cd-9299-2d35bc40a4c8","sAppLang":"en-US","sCharCountAllowed":"4000","sCharCountCommentWordCount":"300","sReportAbuseByCategory":"","sReportAbuseGuideLineUrl":"","sReportAbuseDisapperTime":"10000","context_url":"http:\/\/news.yahoo.com\/amanda-knox-slips-seclusion-brief-shopping-trip-120104427.html","sAllowReply":"yes","sAllowNetworkerFilter":"yes","sDisclosureProp":"y.news","sPostingDisabled":false,"sAllowScreening":false,"sSortOptionDisp":"Popular Now","sYuiBasePath":"yui\/2.8.0r4\/build\/","sCurrentSortBy":"highestRated","sCurrentFltrBy":"all","sCurrentSortByReply":"oldest","sPerPage":"20","rating_type":"up_down","hide_min_neg_percent_rating":"80","hide_min_total_rating":"10","comment_guideline_url":"http:\/\/help.yahoo.com\/l\/us\/yahoo\/news_global\/article_comments\/comments-04.html","oSortOptions":{"highestRated":"Popular Now","latest":"Newest","oldest":"Oldest","mostReplied":"Most Replied"},"tracking":{"_S":"7645365","pt":"storypage","pscat":"","pstaid":"493bc076-c776-30cd-9299-2d35bc40a4c8","intl":"us","lang":"en-US","test":"","sec":"comment","property":"news-en-US"},"oL10n":{"THANK_YOU":"Thank You!","COMMENTS_POST_SUCESS_PRV_MSG":"Your comment has been received and should be available shortly. A preview is shown here.","COMMENTS_POST_SUCESS_PRV_MSG_SCREEN":"Thank you! Your comment is awaiting approval and should be available shortly.","POST_ANOTHER_COMMENT":"Post Another Comment","POST_ANOTHER_REPLY":"Post Another Reply","A_SECOND_AGO":"a second ago","COMMENTS_REPLY_SUCESS_PRV_MSG":"Your reply has been received and should be available shortly. A preview is shown here.","COMMENTS_REPLY_SUCESS_PRV_MSG_SCREEN":"Thank you! Your reply is awaiting approval and should be available shortly.","SERVER_ERROR":"Oops! Try again.","POSTING":"Posting","REQUEST_FAILED":"Oops! Try again.","SIGN_IN_TO_RATE":"Please sign in to rate!","RATE_SIGN_IN_TXT":"
Signing in ensures ratings are counted accurately and prevents system abuse.
Sign in to rate or, sign up for a new account.”,”CLOSE_LINK_TXT”:”Close this message”,”REPLY_LINK_TXT”:”Reply”,”COLLAPSE_REPLIES”:”Collapse Replies”,”VIEW_MORE”:”More”,”COLLAPSE_REPLY”:”Collapse Reply”,”VIEW_ALL_REPLIES”:”View all {0} Replies”,”VIEW_ALL_REPLY”:”View {0} Reply”,”NUM_COMMENTS”:”{0} comments”,”NUM_COMMENT”:” {0} comment”,”PLZ_ENTER_COMMENT”:”Please Enter a Comment”,”ANONYMOUS_DISP_TXT”:”A Yahoo! User”,”POST_CMT_DISABLED”:”Comments have been closed for this article”,”REPLIES_LINK_TXT”:”Replies”,”THUMBS_UP”:”Thumbs Up”,”THUMBS_DOWN”:”Thumbs Down”,”USERS_LIKED_COMMENT”:”users liked this comment”,”USERS_DISLIKED_COMMENT”:”users disliked this comment”,”REPORT_ABUSE”:”Report Abuse”,”SHOW_HIDDEN_COMMENT”:”Show Comment”,”HIDDEN_DUE_TO_NEG_RATING”:”Comment hidden due to low rating.”,”FLTR_ALL”:”All Comments”,”FLTR_SHARE”:”Shared On Facebook”,”MY_COMMENTS”:”My Comments”,”COMMENT_REMOVED”:”Comment removed”,”REMOVE”:”Remove”,”NO”:”No”,”YES”:”Yes”,”ARE_YOU_SURE”:”Are you sure?”,”USER_SAYS”:”{0} says…”,”COMMENT_GUIDELINES”:”Comment Guidelines”,”LEAVE_A_COMMENT”:”Leave a comment…”,”POST_AS”:”Post As”,”RATE_AS”:”Rate As”,”POST_BTN_TXT”:”Post”,”SIGNIN_YAHOO”:”Yahoo!”,”SIGNIN_FACEBOOK”:”Facebook”,”SIGNIN_GOOGLE”:”Google”,”DEAR_USER”:”Dear {0},”,”SUBMISION_SUCCESSFULL”:”Your submission was successful. By flagging comments in this way, you help Yahoo! identify and block abusive comments.”,”THANK_YOU_FOR_CONTACTING_YAHOO”:”You can visit our help page to learn more about Yahoo! Community guidelines.”,”HUMAN_MODERATION_MESSAGE”:”If you need to report this comment for a particularly serious form of abuse such as harassment, impersonation, or threats, please click here to contact the Yahoo! Abuse team.”,”HARASSMENT_MESSAGE”:”Repetitive, uninvited advances, attacks, or comments, or content otherwise posted to harass others.”,”IMPERSONATION_MESSAGE”:”Content that impersonates a third person or organization for any reason, including for any phishing or other fraudulent purpose, e.g. acquiring sensitive information.”,”SEXEUALLY_AND_OFFENSIVE_MESSAGE”:”Content, links to content or images that are sexually explicit or otherwise offensive.”,”THREAT_OF_VIOLENCE_MESSAGE”:”content that is racist, inflammatory or that encourages hatred or violence against a person or group, including based on sex, religion, caste, community, race, disability, nationality, age, sexual orientation, or any other distinguishing characteristic.”,”REPORT_ABUSE_HEADER_MESSAGE”:”Tell us why”,”ABUSE_TYPE_MESSAGE”:”Type of violation”,”REPORT_BTN_MESSAGE”:”Report”,”CANCEL_BTN_MESSAGE”:”Cancel”,”IMPERSONATION_RADIO_BTN_TXT”:”Impersonation”,”HARASSMENT_RADIO_BTN_TXT”:”Harassment”,”OBSCENITY_RADIO_BTN_TXT”:”Obscenity”,”DEROGATORY_RADIO_BTN_TXT”:”Derogatory language”,”OTHER_RADIO_BTN_TXT”:”Other”}};
// ]]>

//

[ [    [[‘Al Davis’, 13]],        ‘http://news.yahoo.com/photos/oakland-raiders-owner-al-davis-dies-1318257539-slideshow/&#8217;,       ‘Click image to see more photos of Al Davis’,       ‘http://l3.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/LVfFJudF5ENZaDAd6wsQPw–/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9aW5zZXQ7aD00NDE7cT04NTt3PTYzMA–/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/Reuters/2011-10-09T213757Z_01_FOX08_RTRIDSP_3_NFL.jpg&#8217;,       ‘630’,       ”,       ‘Reuters’, ], [    [[‘Conrad Murray’, 15]],       ‘http://news.yahoo.com/photos/dr-conrad-murray-on-trial-in-jackson-death-1317135792-slideshow/&#8217;,       ‘Click image to see more photos’,       ‘http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/OcnZ1oL8b35HJTX7lYEc_g–/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9aW5zZXQ7aD00MDI7cT04NTt3PTYzMA–/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/ap_webfeeds/fa85fed941f16915f90e6a706700f31e.jpg&#8217;,       ‘630’,       ”,       ‘AP’, ], [    [[‘ralph steinman’, 12]],       ‘http://news.yahoo.com/photos/nobel-prize-winner-ralph-steinman-dies-1317648781-slideshow/&#8217;,       ‘Click image to see more photos’,       ‘http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/6SIHluTeqosOBRTu37LgdQ–/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9aW5zZXQ7aD00ODk7cT04NTt3PTYzMA–/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/ap_webfeeds/d0147b7437cf8316fa0e6a706700c233.jpg&#8217;,       ‘630’,       ”,       ‘AP’, ], [    [[‘Lisa Irwin’, 13]],        ‘http://news.yahoo.com/photos/missing-missouri-baby-lisa-irwin-1317923557-slideshow/&#8217;,       ‘Click image to see more photos of Baby Lisa’,       ‘http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/vXIeuYfkDVZFmaoREWUyEQ–/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9aW5zZXQ7aD0zNTU7cT04NTt3PTYzMA–/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/gma/us.abcnews.gma.com/ht_baby_lisa_dm_111006_wmain.jpg&#8217;,       ‘630’,       ”,       ‘ABC News’, ], [    [[‘Joshua Komisarjevsky’, 10]],        ‘/photos/connecticut-home-invasion-trial-1316719606-slideshow/’,       ‘Click image to see more photos’,       ‘http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/A1N8mGB5Dh811ytFRPmjhA–/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9aW5zZXQ7aD00NTk7cT04NTt3PTYzMA–/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/ap_webfeeds/ec21b03eeea50514f90e6a70670007ca.jpg&#8217;,       ‘630’,       ”,       ‘AP’, ], [    [[‘CASCO Signal’, 13], [‘Yu Yuan station’, 13]],       ‘http://news.yahoo.com/photos/shanghai-subway-trains-crash-1317124688-slideshow/&#8217;,       ‘Click image to see more photos’,       ‘http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/hPUVHzepCJiFHzudiNhNVw–/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9aW5zZXQ7aD00NTk7cT04NTt3PTYzMA–/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/afp.com/TRHkg5396284.jpg&#8217;,       ‘630’,       ”,       ‘AFP’, ], [    [[‘It is difficult to assess how many birds are affected’, 7]],       ‘http://news.yahoo.com/photos/sweden-hit-by-substantial-oil-spill-1316444749-slideshow/&#8217;,       ‘Click image to see more photos of the oil spill’,       ‘http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/Ii9HcyoayObiPRmw7Ik4PQ–/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9aW5zZXQ7aD00MjA7cT04NTt3PTYzMA–/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/Reuters/2011-09-18T165741Z_01_STO04_RTRIDSP_3_SWEDEN.jpg&#8217;,       ‘460’,       ‘341’,       ‘Reuters/Erik Abel/Scanpix Sweden’, ], [    [[‘Andy Rooney’, 9]],       ‘http://news.yahoo.com/photos/andy-rooney-leaving-60-minutes–1317174717-slideshow/&#8217;,       ‘Click image to see more photos’,       ‘http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/pMvL4lFxAn54rFTcZ0xwcA–/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9aW5zZXQ7aD00MjA7cT04NTt3PTYzMA–/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/ap_webfeeds/b4cf0a91be6cfd15f90e6a706700f8ed.jpg&#8217;,       ‘630’,       ”,       ‘AP’, ], [    [[‘villages where people are trapped under collapsed houses’, 8]],       ‘http://news.yahoo.com/photos/6-9-quake-strikes-india-nepal-1316432147-slideshow/&#8217;,       ‘Click image to see more photos of the quake aftermath’,       ‘http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/ArZHT7_ugJNvdNZr7rXg7A–/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9aW5zZXQ7aD0zNDA7cT04NTt3PTUxMg–/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/AFP/photo_1316422839782-8-0.jpg&#8217;,       ‘512’,       ‘340’,       ‘AFP’, ], [    [[‘The absence of Borders is going to be felt across the industry’, 6]],       ‘http://news.yahoo.com/photos/last-borders-bookstores-close-1316449248-slideshow/&#8217;,       ‘Click image to see more photos of the closing of the last Borders’,       ‘http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/B__uksKyx_HwEP3gUum2qA–/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9aW5zZXQ7aD00MzM7cT04NTt3PTYzMA–/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/ap_webfeeds/aed64c8a04652215f90e6a706700965e.jpg&#8217;,       ‘460’,       ‘313’,       ‘AP/Amy Sancetta’, ], [    [[‘Anders Behring Breivik’, 8]],       ‘http://news.yahoo.com/photos/norway-attacker-anders-behring-breivik-1311602377-slideshow/&#8217;,       ‘Click image to see more photos of the confessed mass killer’,       ‘http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/_E5OB1E6rdgShUt41KVZaw–/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9aW5zZXQ7aD00ODk7cT04NTt3PTYzMA–/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/Reuters/2011-07-25T141034Z_01_SIN725_RTRIDSP_3_NORWAY.jpg&#8217;,       ‘460’,       ‘357’,       ‘Reuters/Jon-Are Berg-Jacobsen/Aftenposten via Scanpix’, ], [    [[‘like there is no way out’, 9]],       ‘http://news.yahoo.com/photos/the-faces-of-poverty-real-lives-real-pain-1316453315-slideshow/&#8217;,       ‘Click image to see more photos’,       ‘http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/OlSRGp1pKLgvYSpy6XCRkw–/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9aW5zZXQ7aD0zOTM7cT04NTt3PTYzMA–/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/ap_webfeeds/45d7db4304d12415f90e6a706700ca26.jpg&#8217;,       ‘460’,       ‘ ‘,       ‘AP/Robert F. Bukaty’, ], [    [[‘including snipers picking off protesters from rooftops’, 5], [‘Violence has flared anew in Yemen in frustration’, 6]],       ‘http://news.yahoo.com/photos/yemen-slideshow/&#8217;,       ‘Click image to see more photos of unrest in Yemen’,       ‘http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/UUZ_CmgwS6mLf75U4D9flA–/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9aW5zZXQ7aD00MjA7cT04NTt3PTYzMA–/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/ap_webfeeds/ea314f80041a2115f90e6a706700681f.jpg&#8217;,       ‘460’,       ‘ ‘,       ‘AP/Hani Mohammed’, ], [    [[‘Dolores Hope’, 7]],       ‘http://news.yahoo.com/photos/dolores-hope-dies-at-age-102-1316466341-slideshow/&#8217;,       ‘Click image to see more photos of Dolores’,       ‘http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/PVmQlI81830Gw1RqCrESFA–/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9aW5zZXQ7aD02MzA7cT04NTt3PTUxNg–/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/ap_webfeeds/4ca0b51519923d15f90e6a70670063b1.jpg&#8217;,       ‘460’,       ‘ ‘,       ‘AP’, ] ]
[  [    [[‘keyword’, 9999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999]],       ‘videoID’,       ‘0’ ], [    [[‘keyword’, 9999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999]],       ‘videoID’,       ‘1’,       ‘overwrite-pre-description’,       ‘overwrite-link-string’,       ‘overwrite-link-url’    ] ]

YOU ON YAHOO! NEWS
Hi there

Login with Facebook to personalize your Yahoo! News experience. Learn more »
  • Your Activity
  • |
  • Social:OFFON
    • Turn Social On
    • Remind me when I share
  • |
  • Options
    • What is this?
    • Not you? Log out of Facebook
    • How to remove this experience

 

 

Advertisements

Gadhafi’s regime teeters on collapse in Libya

Libyan rebel fighters embrace at the former female military base in Tripoli, Libya, Monday, Aug. 22, 2011. Libyan rebels claimed to be in control of most of the Libyan capital on Monday after their lightning advance on Tripoli heralded the fall of Moammar Gadhafi's nearly 42-year regime, but scattered battles erupted and the mercurial leader's whereabouts remained unknown. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev)People celebrate the capture in Tripoli of Moammar Gadhafi's son and one-time heir apparent, Seif al-Islam, at the rebel-held town of Benghazi, Libya, early Monday, Aug. 22, 2011. Libyan rebels raced into Tripoli Sunday and met little resistance as Gadhafi's defenders melted away and his 42-year rule rapidly crumbled. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)

Libyan rebel fighters fire towards forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi during fierce gunfire in downtown Tripoli, Libya, Monday, Aug. 22, 2011. World leaders said Monday the end is near for Moammar Gadhafi's regime and began planning for Libya's future without the man who has held power there for 42 years. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev)

http://news.yahoo.com/gadhafis-regime-teeters-collapse-libya-205608125.html

TRIPOLI, Libya (AP) — Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi was nowhere to be found Monday as his 42-year rule teetered on the brink of collapse. Months of NATO airstrikes have left his Bab al-Aziziya compound in Tripoli largely demolished. Most of his security forces fled or surrendered when rebel forces rolled into the capital Sunday night and took control of most of the city. And three of his sons are under arrest.

 

A mood of joy mixed with trepidation settled over the capital, with the rebels still fighting pockets of fierce resistance from regime loyalists firing mortars and anti-aircraft guns. Rebel spokesman Mohammed Abdel-Rahman, who was in Tripoli, said the “danger is still there” as long as Gadhafi remains on the run.

“The real moment of victory is when Gadhafi is captured,” Mustafa Abdel-Jalil, head of the rebel National Transitional Council, told a news conference in the opposition’s de facto capital of Benghazi, hundreds of miles east of Tripoli. He said the rebels have no idea where Gadhafi is and whether he is even in Tripoli. An Obama administration official said the U.S. had no indication that Gadhafi had left Libya.

President Barack Obama said the situation in Libya reached a tipping point in recent days after a five month NATO-led bombing campaign. However, he acknowledged that the situation remained fluid and that elements of the regime remained a threat.

The Obama administration official said U.S. officials and NATO partners had not been in contact with Gadhafi during the siege on Tripoli. However, the official said American and NATO representatives, as well as Libyan rebels, had all been in contact with people around Gadhafi, mostly those looking for a way out.

NATO vowed to keep up its air campaign until all pro-Gadhafi forces surrender or return to their barracks. The alliance’s warplanes have hit at least 40 targets in and around Tripoli in the past two days — the highest number on a single geographic location since the bombing started in March, NATO said.

A day after the rebels rode into the city of 2 million, the situation remained volatile. Even though rebels claimed they were in control of most of Tripoli, they still appeared to be on the defensive, ducking for cover during frequent clashes with regime fighters. Throughout the day, the rebels sent reinforcements to the city from the north, south and southeast, and a rebel field commander said more than 4,000 fighters were part of the final push to bring down the regime.

The Obama administration official said the U.S. believes 90 percent of the capital is under rebel control, while regime loyalists still control Gadhafi’s hometown of Sirte and the southern city of Sabha.

The official spoke on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publically.

Intense gunbattles erupted throughout the day and city was too unstable for any mass celebrations in the streets.

Clashes broke out early in the day at Gadhafi’s Bab al-Aziziya compound when government tanks emerged from the complex and opened fire at rebels trying to get in, according to the rebel spokesman Abdel-Rahman and a neighbor.

Moammar al-Warfali, whose family home is next to the Gadhafi compound, said there appeared to be only a few tanks belonging to the remaining Gadhafi forces who have not fled or surrendered.

“When I climb the stairs and look from the roof, I see nothing at Bab al-Aziziyah. It is totally deserted except for the house which was raided by U.S. in 1986. Nothing else is there. Gadhafi can’t be there,” he said. “NATO has demolished it all and nothing remained.”

But Abdel-Rahman said Gadhafi still has forces to be reckoned with.

“We know that until now, Tripoli is encircled by Gadhafi brigades positioned at the outskirts of the capital, in camps, such as al-Yarmouk in the south of Tripoli. They can be in the middle of the city in half an hour.”

 

 http://www.hollywoodlife.com/2011/08/19/daniel-radcliffe-robert-pattinson-harry-potter/

Rob’s former co-star looks back on their ‘Harry Potter’ days

Daniel Radcliffe paid a visit to Access Hollywood Live on Aug. 19, and as always, it didn’t take long for the conversation to turn to his Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire co-star Robert Pattinson! ”He’s had to deal with a lot,” Daniel said, discussing people’s obsession with Rob. “[As soon as the Twilight movies came out] Robert was suddenly the most famous guy in the world.”

 

But don’t expect to catch the world-famous wizards hanging out anytime soon.

“We worked together on the fourth [Harry Potter] film, but I haven’t seen him since any of the Twilight movies,” Daniel admitted. “It’s lovely to see anyone from the franchise doing other things and becoming successful, but we haven’t had any contact.”

 

Emma Watson Takes It Off, Then Covers Up – with a Puppy | Emma Watsonhttp://www.peoplepets.com/people/pets/article/0,,20518728,00.html

After shedding her long-running role as Hermione in the Harry Potter franchise, Emma Watson has chopped off her long locks, embraced her inner fashionista – and now, she’s even gone nude. Sort of.

For the August issue of i-D magazine, the actress bared almost all, posing in a sunny garden wearing nothing but a pearly collar and shimmering gold jacket. While the photo hints at what lies beneath, Watson coyly covered up with the help of a strategically placed Yorkshire terrier.

The dog, dangled over Watson’s lap, looks less than pleased with the job at hand, but appears to have acted professionally in spite of it all.

Any Ideas

Here we are yet again. How are ya’ll? Now I know that my posts are kind of boring, so I’m asking ya’ll for any ideas of what I can blog about. (please nothing inappropriate). So. yea please post your ideas and tell me what you think about my blogs. Whatelse do I want to put. Oh! yea I’m now a senior. YAY! At last my final year of high school. Well, any this is it. I look forward to your comments and I hope ya’ll are enjoying my blogs.

Bye

Afghan rally over NATO raid turns violent; 11 die

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110518/ap_on_re_as/as_afghanistan

By RAHIM FAIEZ and HEIDI VOGT, Associated Press Rahim Faiez And Heidi Vogt, Associated Press 41 mins ago

KABUL, Afghanistan – Hundreds of protesters, angered by an overnight NATO raid that they believed had killed four civilians, clashed on Wednesday with security forces on the streets of a northern Afghan city. Eleven people died in the fighting, government officials said.

The demonstrators fought with police and tried to assault a German military outpost in the city of Taloqan, the capital of Takhar province, the officials said, adding that some 50 were injured.

The protest was triggered by an overnight NATO raid on the outskirts of the city. The coalition said four insurgents died in the operation and that two others were detained.

Night raids targeting insurgents regularly stir up controversy in Afghanistan, where angry residents often charge the next day that international forces go after the wrong people or mistreat civilians as they search compounds. Success by NATO in reducing civilian casualties and agreements to conduct night raids alongside Afghan forces have not managed to stem the tide of accusations.

Adding to the confusion, it is often difficult to know who is a militant in insurgent-heavy areas, where entire villages are often allied with the Taliban or other groups.

On Wednesday, hundreds of people gathered on the road from Gawmal to Taloqan and carried the four bodies — two men and two women — on platforms as they marched into the city. They shouted insults at Afghan President Hamid Karzai and the United States as they pumped their fists in the air.

“Death to Karzai! Death to America!” they yelled. Officials estimated there were about 1,500 demonstrators.

The crowd started looting shops and throwing stones at a small German base in the city. Police were out throughout the city trying to calm the crowd, Taqwa said. Gunfire could be heard in a number of neighborhoods and troops at the German outpost shot off rounds in an attempt to disperse the crowd outside their walls.

The German military said in a statement that the demonstrators threw hand grenades and Molotov cocktails into the base, injuring two German soldiers and four Afghan guards. The German soldiers, one of whom was lightly injured and one somewhat more seriously, were both in stable condition, the military said.

At least 11 protesters were killed in the fighting, and 50 people were wounded — some of them police officers, said Faiz Mohammad Tawhedi, a spokesman for the Takhar government.

The raid late Tuesday killed two men and two women who were inside a home in an area known as Gawmal, provincial Gov. Abdual Jabar Taqwa said. He said that no one in his government was informed about the raid and that NATO acted unilaterally.

Provincial police chief Gen. Shah Jahan Noori said he had not been informed of the operation and said none of his officers were involved. Army officials could not be reached immediately for comment.

NATO confirmed it killed four people, two of them women, but said all were armed and tried to fire on its troops.

One of the women was armed with an assault rifle and tried to fire on the troops, NATO said. The other woman was armed with a pistol and pointed her gun at the security force as she was trying to escape the compound.

It is rare for women to be part of an insurgent fighting force in Afghanistan, but not unheard of. There have been cases in the past of women fighting with the insurgency, including as suicide bombers.

NATO said the raid was conducted by a “combined Afghan and coalition security force” and an alliance spokesman said that the governor was contacted ahead of the raid.

“It is standard practice in Takhar province to contact the Afghan provincial leadership prior to an operation. In this case, calls were placed to the provincial governor six times prior to the operation,” Maj. Michael Johnson said.

“We are aware of the claims of civilian casualties, and are looking into them,” Johnson added.

President Hamid Karzai sided with the Afghan officials. He issued a statement condemning the night raid as having killed four members of a family, and said it was not coordinated with Afghan forces.

“Despite repeated warnings that have been issued by President Karzai to top these uncoordinated NATO operations, it seems these types of operations still have not stopped,” Karzai’s office said in a statement.

He said the Afghan people should protest without turning to violence, but also said that the blame for the protest lies with NATO.

NATO said that the raid targeted a man working with the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan — an insurgent group that is powerful in the north. The man was involved in arms trafficking and building explosives, NATO said. The alliance did not say if he was killed or captured.

In the south, meanwhile, a NATO service member died Wednesday in an insurgent attack, the military coalition said. NATO did not provide further details or the service member’s nationality.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/time/20110502/wl_time/08599206889300

By BRUCE CRUMLEY / PARIS Bruce Crumley / Paris 51 mins ago

The dramatic announcement of al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden’s May 1 death came too late for most Europeans to hear about it in real time. But by the earliest hours of Monday morning, both regular citizens and the officials in Europe tasked with protecting them from terror strikes were in full debate about how Bin Laden’s killing might change the activity and determination of jihadists plotting to strike around the globe.

Perhaps not surprisingly, most experts say the charismatic leader’s death represents a symbolic blow to all extremists who looked up to him – and presents surviving al-Qaeda officials in the Afghan-Pakistan region with a real challenge regarding how they’ll operate in his absence. But analysts add it probably won’t change the mechanics of the Islamist terror threatening the world these days. (See TIME’s obit on bin Laden.)

“It’s likely to have the greatest direct impact in the upper echelons of al-Qaeda’s command, which in turn will create even more problems for its leaders to mount very spectacular, complex, and well-organized attacks around the world as a follow-up to 9/11,” says one European security official who works closely with intelligence agencies. “But the vast majority of plots or strikes we see in the world [these days] are the kind carried out by small cells of local operatives, whose contacts with al-Qaeda [in the Pakistani border region] are minimal – usually with medium-level figures, if at all. Bin Laden’s death may have a short-term emotional impact on those far-flung extremists, but that won’t alter the way they function.”

A French counter-terrorism official concurs. “Bin Laden was most effective in projecting the distinct al-Qaeda ideology, and assembling disparate radicals around what extremists consider his unique moral authority,” he comments. “That’s gone now, and with it the personal dedication with which jihadist organizations around the world swore their allegiance. None of those will turn their backs on al-Qaeda or stop using terrorism as the main arm in their international struggle. But there is no single leader they’ll all look up and dedicate their efforts to, which represents a real change.” (See “Remembering 9/11: The Evolution of Ground Zero.”)

Yet this official says that’s a largely symbolic and psychological factor. He notes al-Qaeda was never as structured and centralized as many people once believed. The functioning of its followers and sympathizers around the globe – and particularly in Europe – has become increasingly autonomous, especially since the NATO-led military operation forced al-Qaeda’s leadership out of its former Afghan haven for refuge in Pakistan. Within recent years, experts say, the standard terror cell in Europe has evolved to become smaller, often self-constituted, and usually gets minimal advice or direction from mentors in Southeast Asia. In some cases, a single cell member may have gotten all the training and instruction required during a visit to Pakistan, and relies on that to mount plots over time after he’s returned.

That appears to be the case with a trio of suspects apprehended in Germany April 29 as they were allegedly preparing to test homemade explosives for a planned attack. The three men – one of whom reportedly received training last year in an al-Qaeda camp in Pakistan – had been under police surveillance for six months, and had purportedly discussed targeting public transportation in a strike. Scores of cells that have staged attacks or been thwarted in Europe while plotting over the past decade shared similar profiles – and most received limited direct assistance from al-Qaeda or radicals directly tied to it.

Another example was the three suspected extremists arrested in Norway in July 2010 on suspicions they were planning to make bombs for use on undetermined targets abroad. That group was at one time in contact with an al-Qaeda leader since killed in Pakistan. That leader had put similar bombing plots in motion – one in Manchester, England, and another of the New York subway system that was busted in 2009 – in a trio of planned strikes operating independently of one another, and with little further guidance beyond his initial instructions. Most cells, authorities say, don’t even involve such high-level al-Qaeda input.

“Al-Qaeda is essential as inspiration – and, at times, with training and direction,” the French official says. “But what radicals in Europe and elsewhere in the world are finding and using for indoctrination and terror resources on the internet today are more dangerous to us than what comes to them from Pakistan, much less from Bin Laden or his circle of commanders.”

Still, Bin Laden’s personal force as a symbolic and inspirational figure to admirers – including many who never became active in jihad – raises the risk that some of those may now find sufficient motivation in his death to want to seek revenge for it through attacks. However, that vengeance factor is probably not a game-changer, some suggest. (See pictures of the U.S. Marines’ offensive in Afghanistan.)

“It’s a concern, but I’d argue if you’re involved in or even considering violent jihad in the first place, having one more excuse to justify that with isn’t going to change a lot,” the European official says. “With the 10 years [since] September 11 on the horizon, and other factors also looming, we’d already entered a pretty tense period for possible terrorism before Bin Laden’s killing. His death adds a bit to that tension, but not all that much. Plus, if anyone who’d been bent on attacking is now even more anxious to do so, it could be the extra emotion and fury will make them a bit more vulnerable to tipping their hand.”

See pictures of the battle against the Taliban.

See pictures of a Bin Laden family album.

View this article on Time.com

http://news.yahoo.com/s/time/20110423/wl_time/08599206696000

By ABIGAIL HAUSLOHNER / CAIRO Abigail Hauslohner / Cairo Sat Apr 23, 1:15 am ET

Reports of a thaw in Egyptian-Iranian diplomatic ties has created a stir in the Middle East, particularly in Egypt and its neighbor, Israel. Indeed, even as Egypt struggles to iron out its own emerging political system after the ousting of President Hosni Mubarak, Cairo’s foreign policy is also undergoing a sea change. “If you look at Egypt over the last 20 years, it just hasn’t played a very serious role in the foreign affairs of the region,” says Gary Sick a Persian Gulf expert at Columbia University, who served on the National Security Council under three U.S. presidents. For decades, in fact, the regime of former President Hosni Mubarak acted as little more than a “foreign policy cardboard standup” to its powerful ally and benefactor, the United States. But all that is about to change, he says. “Many of the countries that now have new leaders are going to reset their foreign affairs,” Sick predicts. “And the United States is going to have to get used to that.”

For post-revolutionary Egypt’s new leaders and politicians, forging a new foreign policy means pushing back against much of what Mubarak stood for. That clearly includes Egypt’s perceived puppet-like status to the United States, Europe, and Israel. “Let us eat the way we want, dress the way we want. Let us organize ourselves the way we want to,” says Kamal Habib, a Salafi politician, who was jailed for a decade under Mubarak for his affiliation with a violent jihadist organization. “We don’t want to repeat the Mubarak-American relationship again.” (See pictures of the mass demonstrations in Egypt.)

Habib’s opinion applies to more than just his Salafist cohorts. Many Egyptians want to hit the reset button on their country’s stance on Palestinian statehood, as well as its posture toward the Gaza Strip, where it has helped to enforce an Israeli-led blockade for four years. Most recently, it also includes re-thinking a decades-old enmity with Iran.

Earlier this month, Egypt’s new Foreign Minister Nabil al-Arabi called for a normalization of relations between the two countries. Tehran and Cairo cut off diplomatic ties following the Camp David Accords between Egypt and Israel and the Islamic Revolution in Iran, both of which occured in 1979. Earlier this week, reports filtered out that Iran had appointed an ambassador to Cairo, sparking a flurry of speculation on the future of the relationship. Both countries later denied that the step had been taken. But Egyptian state media reported that Iran’s foreign minister has been invited to visit Cairo. And on Thursday Iran’s state-run Press TV announced that Iranian tourism agencies had signed a deal with Egypt to facilitate tourism between the two countries.

For western policy-makers and the Israeli government, the newfound warmth has set off alarm bells. At the very least, they say, it’s not a positive sign for the countries seeking to isolate Iran in an effort to halt its suspected work to build nuclear weapons.

See TIME’s most influential people of 2011.

See TIME’s exclusive photos in “Uprising in Cairo.”

But it may not be a such bad sign either – at least as far as the U.S., Europe, and other countries in the Middle East are concerned. Other Arab states that have normalized relations with Iran, like Qatar and Oman, have proven useful intermediaries at times between the rogue republic and its western adversaries. In tandem with Brazil, Turkey, the largest non-Arab Muslim nation in the area, independently negotiated a nuclear agreement with Iran when Western efforts at coercion failed. (The agreement did not stick because Western officials declared that it did not meet conditions set by the U.N.) But, while Turkey’s success may have proven embarrassing to U.S. leadership because Washington wasn’t responsible for the deal, Sick says, “the opportunity to actually have a valuable interlocutor between the United States and Iran, I know from personal experience, was immensely useful.”

Whether Egypt aims to become an interlocutor is unclear, and perhaps even unlikely at this point. It is more likely that Egypt’s leaders want to set an agenda that’s independent from the U.S. and Europe. And just because Egypt is trying to regain some of the regional prominence that it enjoyed in the 1950s and 60s when it was a vocal leader of pan-Arab nationalism, doesn’t mean it’s going to be Iran’s new best friend either. “The new Middle East may end up being defined as it was in the past by that triangle of ancient states – Egypt, Turkey and Iran,” says Sick. “And I don’t think that they will necessarily become allies of each other. Rather they’re more likely to be rivals on many different issues.” (See TIME’s complete coverage in “The Middle East in Revolt.”)

One of those issues is a lingering suspicion of Iran’s Shi’ite theocracy and Tehran’s ambitions to “export” its Islamic revolution. Most of the region is dominated by Sunni Muslims; and religious conservatives sometimes view the Shi’a brand of Islam practiced by Iran’s majority as heretical. The rise of a Shi’ite government in Iraq has put other Arab states on edge, and an Egypt friendly to Iran is likely to come under a lot of pressure from some of its Arab allies, particularly Saudi Arabia. Regional analysts also say that Arabs have a tendency to exaggerate fears of Iranian influence. “The really active days of exporting the revolution ended in about 1982,” says Sick. But psychologically, it may still represent a sizable obstacle to normalization of Egyptian-Iranian relations.

At the same time, it’s worth considering who’s really in power in post-Mubarak Egypt. Egypt’s revolutionaries may indeed start flexing their foreign policy muscles against Mubarak’s legacy, but the generals who are temporarily in control of the country may have little interest in bending back the old policies. Mubarak’s number two man, the intensely anti-Iran intelligence chief Omar Suleiman has been removed from power. But in his place is Mourad Mwafi, the former head of Egyptian military intelligence, and the governor of North Sinai who held a hard-line on Gaza and Iran-backed Hamas. “I don’t know what his politics are, but I think he has a very healthy and realistic sense of the threats that Egypt still faces,” says one Western diplomat in Cairo. “I think he is highly skeptical of Iranian intentions – not only the nuclear stuff, but Hamas and Hezbollah and other malign influences in the region. So I think they haven’t lost their antennae on these issues.”

Indeed, Iran may be eager for a new ally in an international community where it remains highly unpopular. Ambassadors may even be exchanged. But Egypt is likely to proceed with caution. At the end of the day, the Western official adds, Egypt’s stance on Iran may not be so threatening after all: “There is no intention at this point, I’m told, to immediately move toward changing the nature of the relationship. It’s not there yet. I think the security services still have some concerns.”

%d bloggers like this: