Tag Archive: iPad


My last first nine weeks

Hey! What’s up? The first nine week are almost over. This week we are having nine weeks exams. The good thing about having five classes you don’t have to worry about taking some many tests. The down side is my schedule was a little messed up. (not much though) My teacher is planning to take a group of students to London and Paris. I’m no sure if I’ll be going on that.(I’ll be sure to let ya’ll know if I’ll be going or not). Other than all that there’s nothing much is going on here. In other news, I’m thinking about writing more poetry. So, be looking for that. I’m also looking for ideas for more blog posts so if you have any ideas please leave a comment and I’ll see what I can do. Later!

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LG CEO’s Slip Supports Retina Display for iPad 3

http://www.pdfdevices.com/lg-ceos-slip-supports-retina-display-for-ipad-3/

Samsung and LG have been the two considerations for Apple’s next tablet production – iPad 3. Both companies have the kind of display technology Apple would want to use on its third gen tablet. The scales tip in LG’s favor as far as winning this deal goes because of the legal unpleasantness that’s only getting worse between Apple and Samsung.

Rumors of an iPad 3 (or iPad 2 Plus) and an iPhone 5 coming out as early as this September have been going around for a while and there are talks of a boosted display on the next iOS tablet. In a meeting with reporters from Korean Times, LG CEO Kwon Young-soo let out an important point with the statement “more smartphone manufacturers will release new models employing LG’s ‘Retina Display’ that has been used in iPhones and iPads.” Now we know that’s true for iPhone but when he says iPad we can only think he means the upcoming tablet.

Young-soo also criticized Samsung for misleading the market with its OLED display promos saying that the displays are not suitable in terms of picture quality, response time, energy consumption, and contrast ratios for smartphones and tablets.

Rumors of an iPad 3 in September have changed somewhat with the possibility of an iPad 2 Plus or iPad 2 HD that could come with doubled up resolution of 2048x1536p and higher 256dpi, targeting the professional segment. We don’t think Apple will have the Retina display on a bumped up iPad 2 model.  iPad 3 would be our bet.

Apple has slammed a lawsuit on Samsung for copying its tablet and smartphone design with the Galaxy lineup of smartphones and tabs. Samsung is giving back as good as it gets and things are fast reaching melting point. Does this mean Samsung and Apple will no longer be partners? They’ve managed to not let legal troubles get in between their business proceedings till now but with the way things are going, who knows.

 

Mission Fuge part one

Hi! everyone. How are ya’ll? I’m fine just dealing with some family problems lately and got I got to think about some stuff I did last year that I shouldn’t have, but any way like the title of today’s posts says I’m going to be talking about Mission Fuge. Yes, I will being going to Mission Fuge this year with the youth group I’m in and we’ll be heading to South Caroline. This is going to be an interseting, but kind of scary because I’ve only been out of state once in my life and I was to young to even remember what happened.( I was two at the time) But yea like it says in the title this is part one and hopefully if I dont forget I’ll do a part two at later date. I guess thats about it for this post so please leave a comment and tell me what you think about my posts or if you went on a mission fuge before tell me how was it.

Bye

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110516/ap_on_sc/us_space_shuttle

By MARCIA DUNN, AP Aerospace Writer Marcia Dunn, Ap Aerospace Writer 30 mins ago

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Endeavour blasted off on NASA’s next-to-last shuttle flight, thundering through clouds into orbit Monday morning as the mission commander’s wounded wife, Gabrielle Giffords, watched along with an exhilarated crowd estimated in the hundreds of thousands.

NASA is winding down its 30-year-old shuttle program before embarking on something new. The event generated the kind of excitement seldom seen on Florida’s Space Coast on such a grand scale — despite a delay of more than two weeks from the original launch date because of an electrical problem.

The shuttle quickly disappeared into the clouds.

“That was four seconds of cool,” said Manny Kariotakis, who was visiting from Montreal. The 50-year-old got goosebumps watching the liftoff with thousands along Highway 1 in Titusville.

Just before launching, commander Mark Kelly thanked all the who put hands “on this incredible ship.”

“It is in the DNA of our great country to reach for the stars and explore. We must not stop,” said Kelly, who also thanked “all of the millions watching today.”

Remarkably, Giffords made a return visit to see Kelly off. She is still undergoing rehabilitation in a Houston hospital to recover from a gunshot wound to the head in an assassination attempt little more than four months ago.

The Arizona congresswoman was shielded from the cameras on launch day, as were the families of the other five astronauts. All watched the liftoff in private.

Giffords has kept out of the public eye since the Jan. 8 shooting that wounded her and killed six in Tucson, Ariz.

She and Kelly said their goodbyes, face to face on Sunday.

With Kelly at the helm, Endeavour and its experienced crew of five Americans and an Italian are headed for the International Space Station. They will arrive at the orbiting outpost Wednesday, delivering a $2 billion magnetic instrument that will seek out antimatter and dark energy in the universe.

Up to 45,000 guests jammed into NASA’s launch site, and thousands packed area roads and towns to see Endeavour soar one last time. Only one shuttle flight remains.

VIPs included Apollo 11’s Michael Collins and four other members of Congress.

Advance estimates had put Monday’s crowd at 500,000, more than the number that saw Discovery’s final hurrah in February. Across the Indian River in Titusville, though, the number of spectators appeared to be down compared with Endeavour’s previous launch attempt on a Friday afternoon.

Titusville Assistant Police Chief John Lau guessed the crowd at between 350,000 and 400,000.

“I don’t know if it was the early morning or what,” Lau said.

Electrical trouble grounded the shuttle on April 29, disappointing the hordes of visitors, including President Barack Obama and his family. Repairs over the past two weeks took care of the problem.

“God Speed Endeavour We’re ready for you!” space station resident Ronald Garan Jr. said in a Twitter update. At launch, the space station was 220 miles high, just southeast of Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Kelly almost didn’t make the flight.

The 47-year-old Navy captain took a leave from training to be by his wife’s side after she was wounded, and it seemed unlikely he would stay with the flight. But Giffords improved and was moved from the hospital in her hometown of Tucson to Houston where Kelly lives and does astronaut training. Her days were filled with rehab work, and he yearned to see the shuttle mission through. A month after the shooting, he announced he would fly.

“Everybody felt that this was the right thing for me to do,” he said at the time. He added that his wife “is a big supporter of my career, a big supporter of NASA.”

He rejoined his crew in February, still managing to see his wife across town every morning and evening.

Giffords’ visit to Kennedy Space Center — the third time she’s seen her husband soar into space — ratcheted up the excitement level for what already was a big event, said launch officials.

Kelly’s identical twin, Scott, who’s also an astronaut, witnessed the launch with his two teenage nieces, Mark’s daughters from a previous marriage.

This is the 25th and final flight of Endeavour, the baby of NASA’s shuttle fleet. It was built to replace Challenger, destroyed during liftoff 25 years ago this past January, and made its maiden journey six years later to capture and repair a stranded satellite. That first flight ended 19 years ago Monday.

Endeavour carried the first Hubble Space Telescope repair team, which famously restored the observatory’s vision in 1993, and the first American piece of the space station in 1998.

It will end its days at the California Science Center in Los Angeles.

As of Monday, Endeavour had logged more than 116 million miles, circled Earth some 4,500 times, spent 283 days in space and carried 170 people, including the last two people to fly a space shuttle for the first time. American Mike Fincke and Italian Roberto Vittori are making their first flight on a shuttle although they’ve been to the space station twice, ferried their by Russian Soyuz rockets.

Fincke will team up with Andrew Feustel and Gregory Chamitoff for four spacewalks during the 16-day mission. It will be the last spacewalks conducted by a shuttle crew.

NASA’s last shuttle flight, by Atlantis, is targeted for July. After that, Atlantis will remain at Kennedy, where it will go on display at the visitor complex. Discovery will head to the Smithsonian Institution’s hangar outside Washington.

American astronauts, meanwhile, will continue to hitch rides to the space station on Russian Soyuz rockets. Private companies hope to pick up the slack, but that’s still years away.

Once Atlantis flies, it will be three years — at best — before Americans are launched again from U.S. soil. Some NASA observers fear it could be a full decade.

The White House wants NASA focusing on eventual expeditions to asteroids and Mars, unfeasible as long as the shuttles are flying given budget constraints.

Ohioan Stan Oliver made a last-minute trip for the launch. The assisted-living residence manager got a ticket to Tampa and then drove Sunday night to Titusville, where he slept in his car.

“This is a once in a lifetime event,” said Oliver, 41, who lives near Dayton. “It was worth it. The roar was intense. I’m glad I came.”

___

AP writers Seth Borenstein and Mike Schneider in Titusville, Fla., contributed to this report.

___

Libyan combat stymies moves on antiaircraft threat

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110515/ap_on_go_ca_st_pe/us_libya_anti_aircraft_missile_threat

By STEPHEN BRAUN, Associated Press Stephen Braun, Associated Press 2 hrs 34 mins ago

WASHINGTON – The fierce combat in Libya has unleashed a once-hidden arsenal of portable anti-aircraft missiles that the government fears could easily be siphoned off to terror groups, giving rise to a potential threat to commercial aviation that the U.S. is only beginning to confront, government officials and arms experts said.

The fears are compounded by suspicions that Libyan government and opposition forces are both deploying fighters with ties to terrorists and mercenaries. With more than 20,000 missile launchers estimated in Libya, there have been unconfirmed reports that some anti-aircraft weapons have already been funneled to North African militants, but amid the vast caches wielded by both sides, there is no solid evidence yet that terrorists have them.

Troops loyal to Moammar Gadhafi and opposition fighters have made frequent use of Russian-built anti-aircraft weapons in the two-month-long civil war, including aging 30-year-old shoulder-fired models to advanced truck-mounted missile launchers, according to battlefront accounts and an array of combat photographs and video.

The availability of man-portable air defense systems, also known as MANPADS, across the world’s conflict zones has long worried counterterrorism officials. Passenger flights have never been targeted by such missiles inside the U.S., but there have been nearly a dozen lethal strikes over the past decade in Africa and Asia.

Surveillance by aerial drones and diplomatic pressure on Libya’s African neighbors to police its porous borders may be the best, if limited, actions the U.S. can take for now. U.S. military planes can fly above the range of the missiles and use electronic jamming to elude them, but detection and evasion gear are considered too bulky and expensive to install in the world’s civilian aircraft fleets.

Congressional officials are pressing U.S. diplomatic and military officials for details on how they might counter the anti-aircraft missile threat in Libya, but said they have heard few specifics. Late last month, Edward R. Royce, R-Calif., chairman of a House subcommittee on terrorism, nonproliferation and trade, urged Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton to step up efforts to monitor and secure antiaircraft weapons — even as rebel units were reportedly receiving new shipments of armaments from abroad.

“The department should be in contact with neighboring countries to exercise vigilance in locating and securing any missiles that may be transiting out of Libya,” Royce wrote in a letter to Clinton. He urged State Department officials to press rebels to keep tight control over any such missile stockpiles. The U.S., he added, should mount “an aggressive missile destruction and recovery program” once a new Libyan government is installed.

A State Department spokesperson, speaking on condition of anonymity to describe the department’s efforts, said an internal task force has turned urgent attention to the threat. The spokesperson also said officials were in contact with the Libyan opposition and international organizations inside the country.

Even those first steps are unlikely to be effective in quickly securing the anti-aircraft missiles and launchers in use in Libya, experts said.

“The problem is that you have amorphous groups on both sides and all sorts of weaponry are coming into play from unregulated caches,” said a former assistant secretary of state, Lincoln P. Bloomfield Jr., who headed a Bush administration effort to recover and dispose of anti-aircraft weapons. “The primary objective is to make sure these missiles don’t cross Libyan borders. In theory, that’s the goal, but it’s not clear it can be done in the middle of a hot war.”

The U.S. general who led the early American airstrikes enforcing the Libyan no-fly zone estimated earlier this month that Gadhafi’s military amassed as many as 20,000 portable missile launchers before the conflict started. That would outstrip similar caches of terror groups and militants in Afghanistan and Iraq in recent years.

“Many of those we know are now not accounted for, and that’s going to be a concern for some period of time,” Gen. Carter Ham, head of the U.S. Africa Command, told the Senate Armed Services Committee last month.

Chad’s President Idriss Deby Itno said last month that a cache of surface-to-air missiles and launchers taken from liberated Libyan stocks already reached al Qaeda’s North African contingent, al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb. Similar accounts have come from Algerian officials but the reports have yet to be confirmed, the U.S. officials said.

The fluid contours of the conflict, with war-torn cities changing hands repeatedly, make it nearly impossible to closely monitor stockpiles. Shoulder-fired launchers can easily be concealed, even from airborne U.S. Predator drones and spy planes, and truck-mounted units can be disassembled or masked by canopies. Poorly armed rebels will not likely give up their limited MANPADS supplies, and Gadhafi’s forces would presumably be hostile to any effort to turn over arms while the U.S. and allied forces enforce the no-fly zone.

Bloomfield, who was special envoy for MANPADS threat reduction in the final year of the Bush administration, worked with the State and Defense departments to track and dispose of weapons of mass destruction and conventional arms. Since 2003, the U.S. has led international efforts to recover 32,000 MANPADS from Afghanistan to the Ukraine — a figure dwarfed by congressional estimates that there are 500,000 to 750,000 worldwide.

The cost of outfitting large passenger planes with defensive devices was deemed too expensive — as much as $3 million per jet. Since 1975, missiles fired at civilian planes in nearly a dozen incidents have killed more than 200 people from Africa to Central Asia. A shoulder-fired missile was blamed for deaths of 11 crew members aboard an Ilyushin cargo plane downed in Somalia in March 2007. Two U.N. transports were struck by missiles over Angola in 1998 and 1999, leaving 23 dead. Two missiles fired by terrorists barely missed a chartered Israeli commercial jet taking off in November 2002 with 271 passengers and crew near Mombasa, Kenya.

U.S. anti-missile efforts involve negotiations with legitimate governments, said J. Christian Kessler, former director of the State Department’s Office of Conventional Arms Threat Reduction, which works with the Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement to counter the anti-aircraft threat. “That process simply can’t function if you’re dealing with a hostile government and an unorganized opposition at war.”

The U.S. has worked to reduce stockpiles of such missiles in 20 other countries with smaller arsenals than Libya, and when the U.S. began renewing ties with Gadhafi’s government, it pressured the regime to disassemble its nuclear weapons program and chemical arms stockpile. But there was no similar anti-missile effort in Libya that might have limited the current battlefield proliferation.

“We really didn’t have our finger on MANPADS as an agenda item,” said Bloomfield, now chairman of the Stimson Center, a nonpartisan global security group in Washington. The issue never re-emerged, he said, because of growing U.S. strains with Gadhafi over the precise reciprocal steps to resolve Libya’s culpability in the 1988 bombing of a Pan AM flight over Lockerbie, Scotland, that killed 270 people.

The missiles sighted in Libyan battle zones are mostly Russian, typically shoulder-fired SA-7 Strela missiles and launchers that date to the 1970s, said Matthew Schroeder, an arms expert with the Federation of American Scientists who has examined images of nearly four dozen separate anti-aircraft weapons in use on the Libyan front. Some SA-7s are likely too old to function.

The head of Russia’s Center for Analysis of World Arms Trade reported last month that Gadhafi’s forces had also amassed between 600 and 1,500 1980s-vintage Russian MANPADS. And recent Associated Press photos and other images from the Libyan front show both sides wielding advanced Strelets vehicle-mounted launchers capable of firing new SA-24 Grinch missiles. KBM, a Russian arms exporting company, confirmed a recent sale of an unspecified number to Gadhafi’s military, according to Aviation News, a trade publication.

The SA-24 has a longer range — accurate to 11,000 feet — than the 1980s Russian models, Schroeder said. Its bulkier vehicle mount would make it harder to hide, said Pieter Wiezeman, a senior arms expert with the Stockholm International Peace Institute, a nongovernment group in Stockholm.

But a carefully-concealed truck-mounted weapon would still be mobile and compact enough to be taken anywhere in Africa, he said, adding: “If someone gets near a runway with some of those missiles in a 4-by-4 truck, how are you going to stop them?”

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http://news.cnet.com/8301-17852_3-20060875-71.html

People are really getting into the iPad 2. There are reports that in China there was a fight beteen a “foreign” Apple employee and a Chinese customer. Now this is taking everything alittle to far. It’s ok to be exicted about the iPad 2 release but when it’s not ok when your getting into fights about it. Now I want ya’ll to tell me what you think. So go to the link above and read more and comment on this post.

http://www.joe.ie/tech/tech-news/ground-breaking-lawsuit-against-apple-over-iphone-and-ipad-location-tracking-0011735-1

So anyways Apple is being sued over the iPhone and ipad location tracking. It comes on the backing of the emergence of a report that came in last week. Apparently, two computer programmers say that Apple’s iOS4 operating system is recording latitude. There really isn’t any evidence to support this claim. It really isn’t certian that the company is even storing this information on databased owned by Apple.

If you want to read more click on the link above and tell what you think.

http://touchreviews.net/extreme-sleeve-ipad-2-gform/

Are you scared that you might accidently damage your ipad 2????

Well, G-form has come up with an excellent sleeve for first and second gen iPad that might just help you overcome your fears of damaging you ipad.

The ipad  Extreme Sleeve is the latest offering from the company that excels in providing  “impact protection”.

The sleeve is soft and floopy and doesn’t and anymore weight to your ipad and its water resistant.

So, if you want to read more click on the lick above and go get the ipad Extreme Sleeve.

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2383895,00.asp

Apple is apparently facing the “Mother of All Baclogs”. Everyone is asking why?

Apple sold 4.69 million iPads during the first calendar quarter, then there was a steep decline in the fourth quater during the peak of the holiday season. The news raised many eyebrows.

It’s difficult to characterize Apple’s iPad sales numbers as a shortfall, because the ipad 2 hasn’t been here for a year yet. So, read more about this and leave a comment.

iPad 2 in kindergarten classrooms: A good idea?

http://www.csmonitor.com/Innovation/Latest-News-Wires/2011/0419/iPad-2-in-kindergarten-classrooms-A-good-idea

Here’s a question is having the ipad 2 in kindergarten a good idea?

Well, a school districe in Maine approved a $200,000 initiative that would give each of its 285 kindergarten students a new hands-on tool: Their very own ipad 2. Their calling this a ” revolution in education”. Now I remember when I was in Kindergarten we didn’t get anything like the ipad 2. All we had were computers that are now out of date.(I was in kindergarten in the late 90’s)

This isn’t the first time that Maine became an early tech adoter. In 2002, Maine was the first state to give out laptops to middle school students and later high school students as a part of a move to boost literacy.

Now please read more and please comment on my post.

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