Tag Archive: MADISON


http://www.poconorecord.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20120326/NEWS90/120329766/-1/NEWSMAP

DESOTO COUNTY, Miss. — A person of interest was in custody Monday in connection with the fatal shooting of a student at Mississippi State University.

Mason Perry Jones was arrested Sunday night at a bus station in Memphis, The Clarion-Ledger reported. He was being held Monday in DeSoto County, Miss., according to WREG-TV.

School officials said 21-year-old John Sanderson, of Madison, Miss., was shot at around 10:00pm Saturday at Evans Hall, a residence for 288 male students on the northwest side of the Starkville campus.

Three male suspects fled the scene, and Sanderson died later Saturday at Oktibbeha County Hospital.

Police are still looking for two men, WREG reported.

A weapon was recovered from the Mississippi State campus after the shooting, according to Bill Kibler, vice president of student affairs.

Dr. Mark Keenum, president of the university, said the shooting appeared to be an isolated incident.

 

Advertisements

http://www.cdispatch.com/news/article.asp?aid=16254

Slim Smith, Dispatch Correspondent

March 26, 2012 12:59:20 PM

 

STARKVILLE – An arrest was made Sunday in connection with the weekend fatal  shooting of a Mississippi State University student.

 

MSU Police Chief Georgia Lindley today confirmed Mason Perry Jones was  arrested for the death of MSU student John Sanderson, 21, of Madison, who died  of multiple gun-shot wounds following a shooting at Evans Hall dormitory shortly  before 10 p.m. Saturday.

 

Jones was arrested in Memphis about 7 p.m. Sunday, by the U.S. Marshal’s  Fugitive Task Force. Jones was arrested on an outstanding armed robbery warrant  out of Jackson, which was not related to Saturday’s shooting, Lindley said,  noting UPD was informed by the marshal’s service on Sunday afternoon an arrest  was imminent and informed of the arrest, as soon as it was made. Though he has  been arrested, charges have yet to be brought against Jones.

 

“The U.S. Marshal’s Service was one of many agencies that have volunteered to  help us in the investigation,” Lindley said. “They came in (Sunday) afternoon  and began working the case. We are very grateful for all of the assistance.  Obviously, this is a very important matter to us.”

 

Lindley would not confirm Jones is the primary suspect and would not  elaborate on whether police now know the identities of two other men sought in  connection with the shooting. The UPD has not yet interviewed Jones and Lindley  would not comment on whether other agencies have interviewed Jones, as part of  the investigation.

 

Witnesses reported three black males were involved in the shooting and left  the scene in a late-model blue Crown Victoria.

 

Police recovered a handgun on campus early Sunday morning. Surveillance tapes  from cameras at the entrances of Evans Hall were being reviewed as a part of the  investigation, said Bill Kibler, Vice President of Student Affairs at  MSU.

 

“Our goal now is to identify the suspects and bring them into custody  immediately,” Kibler said Sunday. He declined to reveal a possible motive for  the shooting, but said police had information from witnesses who “knew what was  taking place.”

 

Evans Hall, one of the older dormitories on campus, is arranged as a  quadrangle. The first floor, where the incident occurred, opens into a  courtyard. The higher floors have balconies overlooking the courtyard. Evans  Hall has two main entrances — the north entrance accesses the first floor and  the south entrance accesses the second floor, which features a game room and  office, along with residents’ rooms.

 

Kibler said the shooting took place outside one of the first floor dorm rooms  and 24 students subsequently were relocated from their first-floor rooms to  preserve the integrity of the crime scene.

 

“This is the first time in our school’s history that such a tragic event has  occurred involving a student being shot on campus,” MSU President Dr. Mark  Keenum said Sunday. “Our campus is known as a safe place, and I want to assure  students, parents, faculty and staff that it continues to be safe.”

 

Entry to dormitory rooms is gained through three levels requiring key-card  access — at exterior entrances, entrances to wings or floors and at residents’  rooms.

 

However, the key-card access system was activated at the time of the  incident, which occurred before 10 p.m. And, Kibler noted, non-residents can be  brought into the dorm by residents, at any hour.

 

A deadly shooting spree on the campus of Virginia Tech in 2007 – when almost  two hours passed before students/staff/faculty were notified that a shooting had  taken place – led to changes on campuses across the country to get the word out  more quickly.

 

Ben Grace, an MSU freshman who lives in Evans Hall, Sunday said he received a  torrent of text messages after the incident.

 

“I was getting all these texts and I’m thinking, “Why is everyone texting  me?” Then I got a call from a friend and he told me what happened. I just  grabbed my laptop and went over to stay with a friend at South Hall.”

 

Another Evans Hall resident, Phillip Bajoras, said he walked into the North  Entrance at about 10 p.m. Saturday.

 

“There were a lot of people standing around and I was wondering what was  going on,” he recalled. “Somebody was saying somebody got stabbed. Somebody  else said he was shot, but nobody said they heard any gunshots.”

 

Barojas said he looked over the balcony and could see the victim, who was  being attended to by “a couple of people” just outside one of the rooms while  police were clearing the courtyard.

 

Having recently transferred from Holmes Community College, Sanderson was in  his first semester at MSU.

Read more: http://www.cdispatch.com/news/article.asp?aid=16254#ixzz1qGffjJZj

Protesters defy efforts to clear Wisconsin Capitol

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110228/ap_on_re_us/us_wisconsin_budget_unions

By DINESH RAMDE and DAVID A. LIEB, Associated Press Dinesh Ramde And David A. Lieb, Associated Press 8 mins ago

MADISON, Wis. – Protesters who spent the night in Wisconsin’s Capitol vowed Monday to remain as long as necessary to speak out against Gov. Scott Walker’s plan to end most collective bargaining rights and demonstrate against his budget.

Walker planned to deliver his two-year budget plan in the state Assembly chamber on Tuesday afternoon. He has said that plan will help make clear why the collective bargaining concessions he is seeking from public employees are necessary to help plug a $3.6 billion shortfall.

Walker has said his budget will include about a $1 billion cut in state aids to schools and local governments. He is also expected to propose dramatic changes to how the University of Wisconsin is organized, make cuts to Medicaid and possibly increase fees to help raise money.

Police said Monday that cleaning of the Capitol continued despite the continued presence of the protesters, as did security preparations for Walker’s budget speech.

Police decided not to forcibly remove protesters after thousands ignored a 4 p.m. Sunday deadline to leave so the normally immaculate building could get a thorough cleaning. Capitol Police Chief Charles Tubbs said no demonstrators will be arrested as long as they continue to obey the law.

“People here have acted lawfully and responsibly,” Tubbs said. “There’s no reason to consider arrests.”

The floors where several hundred protesters had slept previous nights looked unusually bare late Sunday as the smaller crowd of people walked around in socks, lounged on blankets and curled up under jackets.

But organizers said they were confident that demonstrators who were persuaded to leave Sunday would return to continue fighting Walker’s efforts to strip nearly all public workers from their collective bargaining rights except over wages. Protesters have staged a sit-in that began Feb. 15 and hit its peak Saturday, when more than 70,000 people descended on the Capitol grounds for a rally.

Click image to see photos of the Wisconsin protest

By DINESH RAMDE and DAVID A. LIEB, Associated Press Dinesh Ramde And David A. Lieb, Associated Press 8 mins ago

MADISON, Wis. – Protesters who spent the night in Wisconsin’s Capitol vowed Monday to remain as long as necessary to speak out against Gov. Scott Walker’s plan to end most collective bargaining rights and demonstrate against his budget.

Walker planned to deliver his two-year budget plan in the state Assembly chamber on Tuesday afternoon. He has said that plan will help make clear why the collective bargaining concessions he is seeking from public employees are necessary to help plug a $3.6 billion shortfall.

Walker has said his budget will include about a $1 billion cut in state aids to schools and local governments. He is also expected to propose dramatic changes to how the University of Wisconsin is organized, make cuts to Medicaid and possibly increase fees to help raise money.

Police said Monday that cleaning of the Capitol continued despite the continued presence of the protesters, as did security preparations for Walker’s budget speech.

Police decided not to forcibly remove protesters after thousands ignored a 4 p.m. Sunday deadline to leave so the normally immaculate building could get a thorough cleaning. Capitol Police Chief Charles Tubbs said no demonstrators will be arrested as long as they continue to obey the law.

“People here have acted lawfully and responsibly,” Tubbs said. “There’s no reason to consider arrests.”

The floors where several hundred protesters had slept previous nights looked unusually bare late Sunday as the smaller crowd of people walked around in socks, lounged on blankets and curled up under jackets.

But organizers said they were confident that demonstrators who were persuaded to leave Sunday would return to continue fighting Walker’s efforts to strip nearly all public workers from their collective bargaining rights except over wages. Protesters have staged a sit-in that began Feb. 15 and hit its peak Saturday, when more than 70,000 people descended on the Capitol grounds for a rally.

Click image to see photos of the Wisconsin protest

Walker argues that his measure would help close a projected $3.6 billion deficit in the 2011-13 budget. He believes that freeing local governments from having to collectively bargain with public employee unions would give them the flexibility needed to deal with forthcoming budget cuts.

Labor leaders and Democratic lawmakers say the bill is intended to undermine the unions and weaken a key base of Democratic Party voters.

Paul Golueke, 24, a social worker from Milwaukee, said he planned to stay at the Capitol until at least Tuesday’s budget address.

“If the budget contains provisions like in this budget-repair bill, I’ll stay here as long as it takes,” Golueke said. “Scott Walker doesn’t understand our passion. The eyes of the nation, of the world, are on us and we can’t back down.”

The state agency that oversees the Capitol had asked demonstrators to leave by Sunday afternoon, saying the building was in dire need of a cleaning. But it was clear that the estimated 4,000 protesters had no intention of leaving voluntarily.

Tubbs, the police chief, said demonstrators who had occupied all three floors of the Capitol would have to relocate to the ground floor. He said anyone who left the building would not be allowed back in until the morning, although union officials were allowed to deliver food to the protesters during the night.

“It was a victory for peace. It was a victory for democracy,” said Kara Randall, 46, a massage therapist from Middleton who had already spent five nights at the Capitol.

Walker’s spokesman declined to comment late Sunday on the police decision to keep the Capitol open to demonstrators. In an interview earlier in the day on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” Walker said the lengthy protests haven’t eroded his resolve to push forward with his legislative agenda.

“Year after year, governors and legislators before us have kicked the can down the road,” Walker said. “We can’t do that. We’re broke. It’s about time someone stood up and told the truth in our state and said here’s our problem, here’s the solution and let’s do this.”

Walker’s proposal stalled in the state Senate when its 14 Democrats fled the state for Illinois, leaving the legislative body one vote short of a quorum. The Democratic senators have vowed to stay away from Wisconsin for as long as it takes. Democrats in Indiana have boycotted their statehouse for the past week to prevent a vote on Republican-backed proposals to introduce a similar bill.

Sen. Jim Holperin, one of the 14 from Wisconsin, said Monday morning that the Democrats remain united in their intention to stay away until a compromise can be found.

“I just believe there is some middle ground here,” Holperin said.

One of the Democrats, Sen. Lena Taylor, sent a tweet to support the protesters that read: “Thank you for exercising your 1st amend right – I’m glad my actions give you opportunity to stand/sit/express yourself!”

___

Associated Press writer Scott Bauer contributed to this story.

%d bloggers like this: