Tag Archive: New York


more pictures from google

I just thought I’d post some picture from google of places we went to during missionfuge. 🙂 enjoy.

empire state buildingground zero.

yankee stadium.statue of liberty.

ellis island.time square.stardust diner. We visited many places while in New York. Not only that we help many people during the missionfuge part of the trip. If you have any questions please. Or tell me what you think. And please subscribe. Later. 🙂

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Another late post

Hey! I know this is a late post but I just been on here much since I got back from mission fuge so let’s get started.  We went to many place during the New York part of the trip like the Empire State Building.  That was really cool expect the group I was in had to climb the stairs after we got to floor 80 because there was a lot of people and it would have been awhile before we got to the elevator so that was pretty tiring.We went to Niagara Falls too. That was really cool. We got to see the falls up close, and got wet too. lol.  We also went to Time Square that really cool because we saw many street performers and it was the first time that I ever went into a Forever 21.(Or a clothing store with three floors for that matter) It was the first time I ever went into a Disney themed store too. I don’t remember the name of the store but it was really cute. We visited the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island. The boat ride made me really nervous we got especially when we got close to the Statue of Liberty and everyone got to one side to get a better pictures and the boat started to lean-to one side. I really didn’t explore those place, even though I should have.  Ground zero was amazing. I didn’t know several buildings were being built.  There were two fountains and around those fountains the names of everyone who died on 9/11 . We also visited places like Little Italy and Chinatown. We went to a Yankees games and guess who was there Snoop Dog. That’s right Snoop Dog. Me and some other girls almost didn’t get our pictures taken with him cause he was tired of taking pictures with people. Then it was time for mission fuge. This trip had a lot of firsts for me. Like ride on the trains and the subway. The subway was fun expect if you were standing you got jerked around too much and you had to be quick when you got on and off. Then it was time for mission fuge. It wasn’t in New York it was in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. We stayed at Eastern State University. The campuses was nice but hilly and you had to walk a good distant to get were you  needed to get. As for what track I got into I got my first choice. Sosocialcial. We went to places like food banks, mental homes, and old folks homes. Our track leader was really nice. He ia really tall. The one down side was we had to leave the night before fuge ended because it was take us the whole night and the next day just to get back. It took us the whole night just to get to New York as well. The Sunday after we got back we share service. We sang songs we practiced that week and got to share. Then, we had snac fellowship.  All in all it was really fun. I really like the two-story Bugerking and the three-story Macdonald’s. I know I’d never forget this trip. It was a once in a life time thing for me. 🙂

 

In less than a week

Hey! If you’re reading this then that means that your were either board and decided to read or you actually want to know what’s going on with my life. Well, your reading and that’s what matters. So let’s get started with this update. If you’re wondering what I mean by the title it means that in less than a week I’ll be going on mission fuge. I can hardly wait. Because this year we are going to New York City. This will be my first time going to New York. Our youth minister has taken the youth group there before, but like I said this is my first time going to New York.  We will be leaving the twenty-seventh and we will return ten days later. Hopefully, when I get back I’ll have some things to blog about. I’ll make them more detailed if I do blog about mfuge.(I promise) 🙂 I’ll do a better job in actually blogging about mission fuge than last year that’s for sure. So anyway please like my blog and leave a comment and let me know what I should blog about. Later. 🙂

Killer of Florida teen told police he was attacked first

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/03/26/us-usa-florida-shooting-idUSBRE82O0F820120326

By Barbara Liston

SANFORD, Florida |         Mon Mar 26, 2012 4:58pm EDT

SANFORD, Florida (Reuters) – The man who shot and killed an unarmed Florida teenager in a case that has sparked widespread public outrage told police the victim had punched him, knocked him down and slammed his head into the pavement repeatedly before he fired the fatal gunshot.

The account of neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman, was published for the first time on Monday in the online edition of the Orlando Sentinel.

Police in Sanford, Florida, the Orlando suburb where 17-year-old Trayvon Martin was shot dead on February 26, confirmed that the newspaper report appeared to be based on leaked information from someone inside the police department.

“The information in the article is consistent with the information provided to the State Attorney’s office by the police department,” the police said in a statement.

Zimmerman, a 28-year-old white Hispanic, has been widely criticized for following Martin, who was African American, and ignoring a police request that he stop doing so after calling the 911 emergency number to report that the young man in a “hoodie” hooded sweatshirt looked to be “up to no good.”

But in own his version of events, as outlined in the Sentinel report, Zimmerman had given up the chase and was walking back to his sport utility vehicle when Martin approached him from behind.

The two exchanged words before Martin punched the burly Zimmerman in the nose, sending him reeling to the ground. The teenager then began pummeling him and slammed his head into the sidewalk several times, the newspaper said.

At least one witness told police he saw Martin on top of Zimmerman who was calling for help, the newspaper said. It noted, however, that other witnesses had disputed who the cries were coming from.

ABC News quoted a police source as saying that Zimmerman, in a written statement, claimed that Martin also tried to take his gun before the shot was fired.

Zimmerman’s attorney has said his client acted in self-defense. He has not been arrested and Florida’s “Stand Your Ground” law, which broadened the legal definition of self-defense when it was passed in 2005, provides people with immunity from detention or arrest if they use deadly force in their own defense without clear evidence of malice.

RAINY EVENING

Whatever happened on that rainy February 28 evening in Sanford it came as Martin returned from a convenience store carrying a bag of Skittles candy and a can of Arizona iced tea.

Florida law enforcement has been under fire for weeks as protests decrying inaction in the case have spread to cities across the country.

More than two million people have signed an online petition calling for justice in the case, prompting Florida Governor Rick Scott on Monday to caution against a rush to judgment and say state authorities were still gathering facts.

“Justice will prevail,” Scott said in an interview with Reuters Insider in New York. “That’s what we all want. We want the … facts and we want to know that justice happens.”

Last Thursday, Scott said State Attorney Norman Wolfinger had agreed to remove himself from the investigation. Scott appointed another Florida prosecutor, Angela Corey, to handle the case. He also created a task force to study crime prevention and specifically the state’s Stand Your Ground law.

Asked if the case rose to the level of a possible hate crime, Scott said such a judgment would be premature.

Corey called for patience on Monday as her team of investigators continues looking into Martin’s killing.

“Justifiable use of deadly force has been asserted in this case, will continue to be asserted, which will make our job more difficult,” Corey told CNN, referring to the Stand Your Ground law.

Martin, a Miami high school student, was in Sanford, staying at the home of a friend of his father, because he had been suspended from school shortly before his death.

On Monday, a family spokesman said the 10-day suspension came after school officials discovered marijuana residue in a plastic bag inside Martin’s book bag.

“Regardless of Trayvon’s suspension, it had nothing to do with what happened on February 26,” Ryan Julison, the family spokesman, told reporters.

Martin’s mother, Sybrina Fulton, suggested in comments at a news conference that the marijuana residue report was aimed at smearing her dead child.

“They’ve killed my son and now they’re trying to kill his reputation,” she said.

(Additional reporting by Edith Honan and Dan Trotta. Editing by Tom Brown and Christopher Wilson)

http://platform.twitter.com/widgets/hub.1326407570.html

http://www.suntimes.com/entertainment/movies/10217281-421/daniel-radcliffe-will-never-bury-harry.html

Updated: January 26, 2012 6:17PM

He will always be Harry. Daniel Radcliffe makes that fact perfectly clear. You’re playing a game of “what if” with one of the most recognizable faces on the globe, and the good-natured 22-year-old is like an eager puppy.

What if J.K. Rowling wrote another Harry Potter book?

What if it was turned into another film?

What if they wanted him to be the middle-aged Potter someday? He wouldn’t need to have a gut, but still, could he put on the specs again?

“If it was good enough, I would be Harry Potter again. If it was anything short of good enough, I would say no,” Radcliffe says. “I know I wouldn’t be Harry again for nostalgic or dutiful reasons.

“But if I learned one thing in life, it’s that it’s foolish to cut yourself off from anything. My motto is to never say never.”

It’s that motto that’s bringing him into his post-Potter career. After starring in the beloved wizardry franchise with worldwide grosses of over $7.7 billion, he is ready to put down his wand for at least a little while.

“I’ve had a lovely first year away from being Harry,” he says. “I made this movie and did a Broadway show.”

The movie is “The Woman in Black,” opening Friday. Radcliffe plays a widowed lawyer named Arthur Kipps who travels to a remote village to make sense of a recently deceased client’s papers. Instead of staying at some friendly local hotel, he decides to lodge at a creepy old mansion where he encounters a mystery woman dressed in all black. It’s the ghost of a scorned woman who has a yen for vengeance.

It begs the question: Why not run out of there screaming and book yourself at a nice, ghost-free Embassy Suites?

“I was even asking, ‘Why the hell does he stay in the house?’ I want to grab this character, shake him and tell him that he’s not going to do well staying in that haunted dwelling,” Radcliffe says.

“I resolved this question saying to myself, ‘Here is a young man who has lost the wife he loved. He’s almost seeking a guarantee that she is in a better place and they will be reunited someday.’

“He stays in the house because of the power of curiosity,” he says. “Curiosity is what makes us human. The character I play, regardless of what happens, needs to know what happened in this house with this woman in black.

“In the end, the film is about how grief touches people.”

It’s also about those classic horror movie moments that have you dropping your popcorn.

When you’re Harry Potter, however, getting your chills isn’t easy.

“There’s a moment where the ghost sneaks up to me at the window. I didn’t even know how bad it would be until I saw the first cut of the film,” Radcliffe says. “The director simply told me, ‘Just walk to the window and then walk away again.’ He didn’t tell me that there would be any major special effects there.

“When I saw the film I almost lost my lower half. Even on the set, the crew guys were quite protective of me. They knew the ghost effects were going to be chilling. I saw some grown men on the crew mouth the words, ‘Daniel, move!’ People who have seen the film are screaming, ‘Dan, get out of there!’ ”

In the New York apartment where he has lived alone for the last year, Radcliffe says he was turning on a few lights in the middle of the night when the shoot was done and he was on Broadway performing “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying.”

“The bad news is that my dogs live with my mom and dad now. I’ve moved out,” he says. “I couldn’t take the dogs with me because I’m so busy that they would never eat again.

“You need dogs in your house when you make a horror movie to check out the noises,” he quips.

His parents are Alan Radcliffe, a literary agent, and Marcia Gresham, a casting director, two people who always supported his yen to act. They helped him audition for school plays and supported his decision to take it even further and go pro.

His first major role was in a 1999 TV version of “David Copperfield.” In 2001, he was in “The Tailor of Panama” as the son of Geoffrey Rush and Jamie Lee Curtis.

David Heyman, the producer of the Harry Potter films, attended a play where he met Daniel and his father in the audience.

“At that moment, I looked at Dan and thought, ‘He is Harry Potter,’ ” Heyman says of casting Radcliffe in 2001’s “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.”

The Potter franchise, concluding with last year’s “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2” (2011), became Radcliffe’s childhood album.

“I’m seriously proud of the last two films,” he says. “They so far surpassed my dreams. It’s great to hear from people who didn’t even see the other films and have no emotional connection loving the last film.”

Some thought he deserved an Oscar nomination for playing Potter. “People asked about my chances and I say I would be more likely to get hit by an Oscar if it came flying at me,” he said.

“I don’t need anything else. I had the role of a lifetime.”

He came away with some Potter souvenirs. “I got two pairs of the glasses. All I had to do was ask,” he says with a laugh. “I have one pair of glasses from the first film and one from the last.”

Radcliffe hopes to wind up behind the camera. “I would love to direct,” he says, fretting, “The problem is I’d employ all of my friends. I wouldn’t have a single unpleasant person around me.

“But I would love to step behind the camera and stay in front of it, too,” he says. “Life is full of possibilities.”

The only thing not possible: Developing a star attitude.

“I’m just a crazy kind of actor who just cares about the work,” Radcliffe says. “The truth is I didn’t get an attitude over the last several years, which was a conscious choice. Why get an attitude when your job is to be a wizard and defeat evil and fly through the air? It’s a good job.

“I’m just a bad movie star!” he cries. “But the truth is I’ve always had an intrinsic dislike of people with attitudes. I never trusted those kinds of people.

“If I ever became that kind of actor, I’d have to sit myself down … and have a talk with myself.”

Big Picture News Inc.

http://news.yahoo.com/americas-most-wanted-return-cable-dec-2-194857648.html

NEW YORK (AP) — Bad guys, look out! John Walsh will be back on the air next month with weekly editions of “America’s Most Wanted.”

The Lifetime cable TV network announced Tuesday the crime-fighting series will return for its 25th season on Dec. 2. Lifetime has ordered 20 weekly hour-long episodes.

Walsh remains the host of the criminal roundup, which since 1988 has helped bring almost 1,200 fugitives to justice.

Until June, “America’s Most Wanted” had been a fixture on the Fox network. But last spring Fox announced it was axing the series because of high production costs.

Walsh calls his show “the court of last resort” in its mission to put criminals behind bars.

Walsh’s 6-year-old son, Adam, was kidnapped and killed in 1981.

 

http://www.nypost.com/p/entertainment/tv/inventing_walsh_roxobSmgcUnlhLZnAHsxFK?utm_campaign=Post10&utm_source=Post10Alpha

While John Walsh closes one chapter of “America’s Most  Wanted” and opens another, he can reflect on his self-described “incredible journey” from luxury-hotel builder to TV’s top crimebuster in a  genre that didn’t exist before he came along.

The first of Walsh’s four “AMW” specials airs tomorrow night on Fox — its  home since 1988. Meanwhile, the series soon moves to a new home on Lifetime.

It’s been 30 years since Walsh’s 6-year-old son, Adam, was kidnapped and  brutally murdered — a horrific, life-altering experience that changed the  course of Walsh’s life.

“I was building a $26 million hotel on Paradise Island [when he heard the  news] — that was my love, the hotel business,” says Walsh. “I was successful at  a young age and was part-owner of my own company who went from that business  into the horrible reality of being the parent of a murdered child . . . I didn’t  give a damn anymore about building hotels.”

Walsh’s single-minded pursuit of justice on Adam’s behalf led Fox to hire  Walsh, in 1988, to host its new show, “America’s Most Wanted.”

“I kept saying no. I didn’t know d–k about TV,” Walsh says. “I said, ‘What  is reality TV and what the hell is Fox?’ ’’ But Walsh’s wife, Reve, encouraged  the move and, before long, he was shooting a pilot.

“My first executive producer, Michael Linder, said, ‘Look, you’re made for  TV. You’ve got the hair, the voice, you’re a handsome guy and I’m gonna teach  you how to do this.’

“I would get nervous the day before a shoot . . . it was all by the  seat-of-your pants,” he says. “The learning curve was steep. It was torture. I  didn’t even know which camera was on and I didn’t know where to look.”

“AMW” nabbed a fugitive from the FBI’s most-wanted list in its very first  show and hasn’t looked back.

When, in 1996, Fox canceled the show, the outcry from the law-enforcement  community forced it to reverse its decision.

Walsh says he hasn’t always had a harmonious relationship with law  enforcement.

“When we first started, the  FBI endorsed ‘AMW’ but the small police departments were skeptical about the  media,” Walsh says. “I think the cops knew that, right off the bat, I would be  very critical of them. American cops look at me as an extension of them . . .  but I’m not a cop, and I still keep that distance,” he says.

“I could write books about my battles with law enforcement — they’re my best  buddies, then they shut me out of a case.

“I’ve got a track record, but it’s been a little adversarial over the  years.”

Read more: http://www.nypost.com/p/entertainment/tv/inventing_walsh_roxobSmgcUnlhLZnAHsxFK#ixzz1c6kqnhNc

 

Amanda Knox’s dad: ABC producer gave kids her room

http://news.yahoo.com/amanda-knoxs-dad-abc-producer-gave-kids-her-233513864.html

NEW YORK (AP) — The courtship of Amanda Knox’s family by American television networks eager to win an exclusive interview with her extended to providing temporary accommodations for two of her younger sisters.

Knox’s father, Curt Knox, said Friday that an ABC producer let his daughters Ashley, 16, and Delaney, 13, stay in her room while court was in session. He said a CBS producer did, too, and an NBC producer offered to.

Amanda Knox, 24, returned to the United States on Tuesday after an Italian court overturned her murder conviction in the death of her roommate. The former exchange student from Seattle had been in custody since 2007.

Networks are competing for an interview with her, even before it’s clear if she’ll even tell her story in that venue. There has been increased attention lately on how networks get these interviews, with ABC declaring this summer it would no longer pay interview subjects to license photos or videos, seen as a dodge of the common journalistic practice of not paying people to tell their stories.

Producers might be able to help the Knoxes see if they could find care for their teenage daughters, but offering something with a specific monetary value — their hotel rooms — isn’t a good idea, said Kelly McBride, senior faculty member for ethics at the Poynter Institute, a journalism think tank.

Even without a specific expectation of something in return, “it is unfair to the source because they are in a position of vulnerability,” McBride said.

Curt Knox said that although ABC producer Nikki Battiste permitted his children to use her room, she was doing her job and did not babysit the teenagers. He said Battiste wasn’t in the room with them.

ABC News spokeswoman Jeffrey Schneider said the network didn’t have a problem with Battiste’s actions.

Knox said that CBS producer Sabina Castelfranco also permitted the children to use her room. But CBS spokeswoman Sonya McNair denied this, saying Castelfranco turned down the request when asked and checked out of the small hotel. McNair said it was unclear whether the room was made available to the children after Castelfranco checked out.

Knox said NBC producer Stephanie Siegel offered her room but it wasn’t used. NBC spokeswoman Lauren Kapp denied that such an offer was made.

Battiste and Siegel also accompanied Knox’s wife and the two girls on a shopping trip near the Italian courtroom but didn’t buy anything for the family, he said.

It’s unclear whether any efforts by networks to ingratiate themselves with Knox will make any difference.

“The kind gesture to allow my younger daughters, who couldn’t get into the courtroom due to age, will not have any influence as to which network, if any, that Amanda may choose to go with in the future,” he said.

FILE - In this May 17, 2010 file photo, TV personality John Walsh attends the FOX Upfront presentation in New York. "America's Most Wanted" is resuming its decades-long run on a new network, Lifetime, host John Walsh and the network said Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2011. (AP Photo/Peter Kramer, file)http://news.yahoo.com/john-walsh-bring-most-wanted-lifetime-221109708.html

NEW YORK (AP) — “America’s Most Wanted” is resuming its decades-long run on a new network, Lifetime, host John Walsh and the network said Tuesday.

The deal will restore to the air Walsh’s weekly criminal roundup, which since 1988 has helped bring almost 1,200 fugitives to justice.

The series will return for its 25th season later this year.

In May, Fox announced it was axing the series, citing high production costs, though the network said it would air four quarterly specials in the coming season. The first of those specials will air in October.

But Fox’s final weekly “AMW” was telecast in June.

In a happy coincidence, on Saturday, Walsh will get a special Emmy Award in tribute to his show.

___

 

Anthony trial a showcase for HLN’s Nancy Grace

http://news.yahoo.com/anthony-trial-showcase-hlns-nancy-grace-193913620.html

  • FILE - In this May 24, 2011 file photo, CNN Headline News host Nancy Grace arrives at the Orange County Courthouse for the trial of Casey Anthony, in Orlando, Fla. The former prosecutor took up the cause of 2-year-old Caylee Anthony when she was missing, spending hour upon hour on the case as mother Casey was charged with the girl's murder. Grace harbored nothing but disdain for "tot mom," as she called Anthony, and with Grace in the lead HLN's coverage of Anthony's acquittal brought the network the largest audience in its 29-year-history. (AP Photo/Joe Burbank, file)FILE – In this May 24, 2011 file photo, CNN Headline News host Nancy Grace arrives …

NEW YORK (AP) — Nancy Grace may now be the most polarizing host in cable television news — and that’s saying something.

The former prosecutor took up the cause of 2-year-old Caylee Anthony when the child went missing and spent hour after hour on the case as mother Casey was charged with her daughter’s murder. Grace harbored nothing but disdain for “tot mom,” as she called Anthony. With Grace in the lead studio chair, coverage of Anthony’s acquittal on Tuesday brought HLN the largest audience in its 29-year-history.

Grace’s audience of nearly 3 million people that night was also a personal high. She brings the same in-your-face opinionated approach to legal news that several Fox News Channel and MSNBC personalities bring to politics, and viewers strongly endorsed it. Yet her assertion that the Anthony jury was “kooky” and post-verdict statement that “the devil is dancing tonight” seemed over the top even by Grace standards, offering fresh material for both those who cheer her advocacy and others who find her overbearing.

One of the jurors in the Anthony case, Elizabeth Ford, told ABC News that the 51-year-old Grace was not fit for television.

“I think a lot of things she says fuel the fire and they’re based on nothing,” Ford said. “I’m obviously against making decisions based on just speculation and opinion.”

Back down? You don’t know Nancy. After one of Anthony’s lawyers said the verdict should send a message to those who engage in “media assassination” — remarks considered largely aimed at Grace — she said she wasn’t concerned. “I don’t like them much either,” she said on a CNN blog.

“When I take a stand, I don’t expect people to like what I have to say,” Grace, who declined to be interviewed by The Associated Press, told ABC News. “But I do hold myself up to the standard of trying to tell the truth. And if they don’t like it or if it hurts their feelings, there’s nothing I can do about that. But I can tell you this much: That mom is guilty.”

Grace’s career was fueled by a personal fire. Her fiancé, college student Keith Griffin, was murdered in 1979 when Grace was 19. The tragic crime caused her to abandon her plans to teach English and turn to law. She wound up working in the Atlanta-area district attorney’s office, often on cases involving women or children. But the Georgia courts also cited her for prosecutorial misconduct on one or two cases.

Telegenic and not reluctant to take stands, she became a popular television figure with legal experts in demand in the post-O.J. Simpson era.

Her prime-time HLN show concentrates on criminal cases with a laser-like focus, particularly cases involving children; she has twin pre-school children herself.

This past week, Grace’s impact could be seen in the streets outside the Orlando, Fla., courtroom where Anthony was tried, where dozens of women reacted angrily to the verdict. Some held signs in tribute of Caylee, whose face is kept alive in photographs repeatedly shown on Grace’s program.

But cross Grace at your own peril. She can bluntly — rudely, many viewers perceive — cut you off on her show if you disagree with her. Grace’s prosecutorial mindset can convict people in the court of opinion even if they aren’t in a real courtroom, with Anthony a perfect illustration. Most Americans are happy to see Grace on TV, “because she’s not hiding in the back of our car with piano wire and those cold, black eyes,” HBO’s Bill Maher joked.

“I feel like I owe the nation community service for having hired her and put her on television,” said Steve Brill, founder of the now-defunct Court TV. “She’s a monster.” At Court TV, anchors and commentators were instructed to explain the legal process to viewers but not opine on guilt or innocence, he said.

Dan Abrams, ABC legal analyst, said Grace has never pretended to be a journalist and is instead an activist-analyst. During the Anthony trial, Abrams and Grace discussed the case during regular joint appearances on “Good Morning America.”

“I often wholeheartedly disagree with Nancy’s analysis and, as I’m watching her, sometimes I’m rolling my eyes,” Abrams said. “That said, I respect the fact that she’s transparent with the viewers about how she feels. There’s no mistaking what Nancy Grace’s take is on a story. She may be wrong. She may be unfair. But I think that the viewers are smart enough to make that decision about whether they agree.”

She’s been an important advocate on behalf of crime victims and children’s’ rights, keeping up the momentum on cases that might otherwise have been forgotten, said Pattie Fitzgerald, founder of Safely Ever After, a California organization that develops school curriculum to teach children how to combat abuse.

Grace strongly went after the alleged rapists in the 2006 Duke University lacrosse case. The accusations turned out to be false and all three lacrosse players were declared innocent. Grace also devoted a lot of time to the Natalee Holloway case and the Elizabeth Smart kidnapping.

But Fitzgerald said Grace often crosses the line by being too one-sided. “Everyone is guilty,” she said.

Grace last year settled a wrongful death lawsuit with the parents of Melinda Duckett, a 21-year-old mother of a missing son, who committed suicide in 2006 the day a pre-taped interview with Grace was about to air. The lawsuit accused Grace of inflicting emotional distress on Duckett with her questions and saying the woman was hiding something because she did not take a lie detector test. Police later said Duckett was the prime suspect in the 2-year-old boy’s disappearance.

Ilene Farmer, a lawyer in Baltimore’s public defender’s office, said Grace has undermined respect for the jury system the way she has spoken out against the Anthony verdict. She said she’s worried that someone who disagrees with the verdict, whipped up by Grace’s disgust, will harm some of the jurors.

ABC’s Terry Moran on “Nightline” asked Grace if some of what she does could be perceived as unethical.

“The day that it is unethical to care about the murder of a 2-year-old little girl who ends up duct-taped and thrown into a swamp is the day that I, too, will retire and rue the justice system,” she said.

She said on the CNN blog that she’d like to see Anthony admit guilt. “Other than that, I’m not in the business of forgiving,” she said. “That’s up to the Lord. I’m just relieved that I believe, that I know, Caylee is in a place where her mother can’t hurt her anymore.”

HLN, the former CNN Headline News, struck gold by following Grace’s interest in the Anthony case and giving full coverage to the trial. Years ago that would have been a niche for Court TV, but that network was converted to TruTV and largely shows flashy nonfiction programming.

HLN isn’t letting go until every ounce of interest is squeezed from the case. Its executives largely scrapped the network’s weekend schedule to run nearly wall-to-wall Anthony material, much of it hosted by Grace.

Scot Safon, HLN’s chief executive, said he was very comfortable with how Grace presented the case. The only thing Grace would have done different, she said in the CNN blog, “is put on my hip boots and gone down to Florida and looked for Caylee myself.”

___

Online:

http://www.cnn.com/hln

___

EDITOR’S NOTE — David Bauder can be reached at dbauder”at”ap.org

 

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