Tag Archive: Rise of the Planet of the Apes


3-D ‘Lion King’ roars to $30.2M opening

http://news.yahoo.com/3-d-lion-king-roars-30-2m-opening-211914538.html

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A re-release of an old movie topped several new offerings at the box office, with “The Lion King 3-D” making $30.2 million in its debut.

Monday’s final figure surpassed the Sunday studio estimate of $29.3 million.

The Disney animated musical favorite, now rendered in 3-D, features the voices of Matthew Broderick, Nathan Lane, James Earl Jones and Jeremy Irons. It was the rare family film in a sea of challenging and R-rated fare this past weekend.

Last week’s top movie, the Warner Bros. thriller “Contagion,” dropped into second place with $14.5 million. It’s now grossed $44.3 million over two weeks.

The top 20 movies at U.S. and Canadian theaters Friday through Sunday, followed by distribution studio, gross, number of theater locations, average receipts per location, total gross and number of weeks in release, as compiled Monday by Hollywood.com are:

1. “The Lion King 3-D,” Disney, $30,151,614, 2330 locations, $12,941 average, $30,151,614, one week.

2. “Contagion,” Warner Bros., $14,548,433, 3222 locations, $4,515 average, $44,260,524, two weeks.

3. “Drive,” FilmDistrict, $11,340,461, 2886 locations, $3,929 average, $11,340,461, one week.

4. “The Help,” Disney, $6,513,039, 3014 locations, $2,161 average, $147,439,793, six weeks.

5. “Straw Dogs,” Sony Screen Gems, $5,123,760, 2408 locations, $2,128 average, $5,123,760, one week.

6. “I Don’t Know How She Does It,” Weinstein Co., $4,402,201, 2476 locations, $1,778 average, $4,402,201, one week.

7. “The Debt,” Focus, $2,942,631, 1831 locations, $1,607 average, $26,564,431, three weeks.

8. “Warrior,” Lionsgate, $2,860,325, 1883 locations, $1,519 average, $10,002,625, two weeks.

9. “Rise of the Planet of the Apes,” Fox, $2,658,131, 2340 locations, $1,136 average, $171,651,537, seven weeks.

10. “Colombiana,” Sony Tristar, $2,330,291, 1933 locations, $1,206 average, $33,377,523, four weeks.

11. “Shark Night 3-D,” Relativity Media, $1,801,701, 2082 locations, $865 average, $17,310,402, three weeks.

12. “Spy Kids 4: All the Time in the World,” Weinstein Co., $1,590,367, 1650 locations, $964 average, $36,107,734, five weeks.

13. “Crazy Stupid Love,” Warner Bros., $1,566,182, 1145 locations, $1,368 average, $80,736,273, eight weeks.

14. “Our Idiot Brother,” Weinstein Co., $1,2944,791, 1747 locations, $741, $23,672,210, four weeks.

15. “The Smurfs,” Sony Animation Columbia, $1,243,268, 1419 locations, $876 average, $137,593,881, eight weeks.

16. “Kevin Hart: Laugh at My Pain,” Code Black Entertainment, $1,190,756, 230 locations, $5,177 average, $3,598,262, two weeks.

17. “Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark,” FilmDistrict, $1,124,591, 1334 locations, $843 average, $22,783,502, four weeks.

18. “Apollo 18,” Weinstein Co., $1,097,433, 1795 locations, $611 average, $16,885,842, three weeks.

19. “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2,” Warner Bros., $700,498, 601 locations, $1,166 average, $378,180,621, 10 weeks.

20. “Captain America: The First Avenger,” Paramount, $563,946, 540 locations, $1,044 average, $174,301,520, nine weeks.

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Online:

http://www.hollywood.com

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Universal and Focus are owned by NBC Universal, a unit of Comcast Corp.; Sony, Columbia, Sony Screen Gems and Sony Pictures Classics are units of Sony Corp.; Paramount is owned by Viacom Inc.; Disney, Pixar and Marvel are owned by The Walt Disney Co.; Miramax is owned by Filmyard Holdings LLC; 20th Century Fox and Fox Searchlight are owned by News Corp.; Warner Bros. and New Line are units of Time Warner Inc.; MGM is owned by a group of former creditors including Highland Capital, Anchorage Advisors and Carl Icahn; Lionsgate is owned by Lions Gate Entertainment Corp.; IFC is owned by Rainbow Media Holdings, a subsidiary of Cablevision Systems Corp.; Rogue is owned by Relativity Media LLC.

 

 

 

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http://blog.movies.yahoo.com/blog/1110-get-ready-to-be-creeped-out-for-five-seconds-by-the-rise-of-the-planet-of-the-apes-ape/?nc

Of all the reboots, prequels and origin stories going on in Hollywood franchises right now, there hasn’t been as much talk about this August’s “Rise of the Planet of the Apes,” which takes place in modern-day San Francisco and sets into motion the simian revolution that knocks humanity off its perch as masters of Earth. When the original “Planet of the Apes” with Charlton Heston came out in 1968, one of the things that made it a classic (beyond its awesomely campy dialogue) was its cutting-edge ape makeup. Forty-three years later, the prequel has just unveiled a short clip of what the apes will look like this time. It’s pretty lifelike — and kinda creepy.

The apes will be all CGI for the new film, which is directed by relative unknown Rupert Wyatt (he previously did the British prison-break movie “The Escapist”). The effects work was done by director Peter Jackson’s Weta Digital, which handled his “Lord of the Rings” trilogy and “King Kong,” so they’ve got some experience making monkeys seem human. But they’ve topped themselves with this footage, although we do have to remind everyone that it’s all of five seconds long.

What can you see in five seconds? Well, it’s a simple shot of an ape who slowly moves his eyes to the right in a pretty natural, human way, underscored by some low, ominous music in the background. The impression this clip is supposed to make is pretty obvious: (1) Man, that monkey looks real; and (2) Uh oh, something bad is about ready to go down.

Andy Serkis (who did the motion-capture work for Gollum in the “Lord of the Rings” films) will be playing Caesar, the main ape in this prequel, which also stars James Franco and Freida Pinto. The assumption is that this footage is of Caesar, but honestly we’re just guessing. Regardless, it appears we won’t have to worry about the apes in “Rise of the Planet of the Apes.” We should point out, though, that when Fox tried to do a “Planet of the Apes” remake 10 years ago with Mark Wahlberg, the ape costumes looked pretty impressive, too — it was just everything else about that movie that was absolutely shoddy.

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